Backwoodsok

» Support TQJ

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!

» Online Users: 28

4 members and 24 guests
Most users ever online was 459, 11-07-2010 at 10:58 PM.

» Stats

Members: 3,109
Threads: 14,363
Posts: 157,535
Top Poster: PigCicles (10,055)
Welcome to our newest member, Mienshao
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Ruskin, FL
    Posts
    6,290

    Default New Pork Guidelines from The USDA

    USDA Revises Recommended Cooking Temperature for All Whole Cuts of Meat, Including Pork, to 145 F

    Cooking Temperature for Ground Pork, Beef, Veal, Lamb remains at 160 F
    Kathy Bernard (301) 344-4764

    WASHINGTON, May 24, 2011 - The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is updating its recommendation for safely cooking pork, steaks, roasts, and chops. USDA recommends cooking all whole cuts of meat to 145 F as measured with a food thermometer placed in the thickest part of the meat, then allowing the meat to rest for three minutes before carving or consuming.

    This change does not apply to ground meats, including ground beef, veal, lamb, and pork, which should be cooked to 160 F and do not require a rest time. The safe cooking temperature for all poultry products, including ground chicken and turkey, remains at 165 F.

    "With a single temperature for all whole cuts of meat and uniform 3 minute stand time, we believe it will be much easier for consumers to remember and result in safer food preparation," said Under Secretary Elisabeth Hagen. "Now there will only be 3 numbers to remember: 145 for whole meats, 160 for ground meats and 165 for all poultry."

    USDA is lowering the recommended safe cooking temperature for whole cuts of pork from 160 F to 145 F and adding a three-minute rest time. The safe temperature for cuts of beef, veal, and lamb remains unchanged at 145 F, but the department is adding a three-minute rest time as part of its cooking recommendations. Cooking raw pork, steaks, roasts, and chops to 145 F with the addition of a three-minute rest time will result in a product that is both microbiologically safe and at its best quality.

    Why the Rest Time is Important

    A "rest time" is the amount of time the product remains at the final temperature, after it has been removed from a grill, oven, or other heat source. During the three minutes after meat is removed from the heat source, its temperature remains constant or continues to rise, which destroys pathogens. USDAs Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) has determined that it is just as safe to cook cuts of pork to 145 F with a three minute rest time as it is to cook them to 160 F, the previously recommended temperature, with no rest time. The new cooking suggestions reflect the same standards that the agency uses for cooked meat products produced in federally inspected meat establishments, which rely on the rest time of three minutes to achieve safe pathogen reduction.

    Appearance of Cooked Pork

    The new cooking recommendations clarify long-held perceptions about cooking pork. Historically, consumers have viewed the color pink in pork to be a sign of undercooked meat. If raw pork is cooked to 145 F and allowed to rest for three minutes, it may still be pink but is safe to eat. The pink color can be due to the cooking method, added ingredients, or other factors. As always, cured pork (e.g., cured ham and cured pork chops) will remain pink after cooking.

    Appearance in meat is not a reliable indicator of safety or risk. Only by using a food thermometer can consumers determine if meat has reached a sufficient temperature to destroy pathogens of public health concern. Any cooked, uncured red meats including pork can be pink, even when the meat has reached a safe internal temperature.

    For more information about raw pork, including storage information, see our fact sheet at www.fsis.usda.gov/Fact_Sheets/
    Pork_From_Farm_to_Table. Consumers can also "Ask Karen," FSIS virtual food safety representative, at AskKaren.gov or m.AskKaren.gov (Mobile Ask Karen) on your smartphone. Mobile Ask Karen is a web-based app that makes "Karen" more accessible and adaptable to todays on-the-go lifestyle. Now, Americans can take Karen with them in the grocery store aisle, outside to the grill anywhere you need information on food preparation or food safety tips. Just like using Ask Karen from a desktop or laptop computer, consumers can search for nearly 1,500 answers by topic or by product.

    The USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline (1-888MPHotline) has food safety experts available Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. EST (English or Spanish). Listen to timely recorded food safety messages at the same number 24 hours a day. Check out the FSIS Web site at www.fsis.usda.gov. E-mail questions can be answered by MPHotline.fsis@usda.gov.

    #


    Last Modified: May 24, 2011

    http://www.fsis.usda.gov/News_&_Even...1_01/index.asp
    ~Brian~
    BBQ Jones comp team
    KCBS Member
    KCBS CBJ

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Carthage, MO
    Posts
    10,055

    Default

    I heard about this earlier today. Thanks for digging it up for us
    Plank Owner ..................
    I didn't fight my way to the top of the food chain to be a vegetarian!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Tulsa
    Posts
    4,976

    Default

    I'll buy it for pork, but I am not cooking my beef and pork to 145.

    I am curious, are they then saying that things have changed, or are they just saying that they were wrong in the first place?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    158

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SmokyOkie View Post
    I'll buy it for pork, but I am not cooking my beef and pork to 145.

    I am curious, are they then saying that things have changed, or are they just saying that they were wrong in the first place?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Green Bay, WI
    Posts
    405

    Default

    22' reconstructed Weber
    Iron man- old red ecb w/ super mods
    AquaLung - UDS

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    125

    Default

    I agree except for brisket, I'm not cooking my beef past 132.
    Webber performer deluxe
    Cinder block smoker
    Cabinet smoker
    Gravity feed 36x24x48 coming soon!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    St. Petersburg, Fl.
    Posts
    4,717

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by helidoc View Post
    I agree except for brisket, I'm not cooking my beef past 132.
    Those are very old guidelines. I would Google the new ones.

    132 may work for some roasts(for slicing) and steaks, but it would make for one tough brisket and a chuck roast would never pull at that temp. Brisket and chuck(for pulled beef) need to pass the probe tender test. That usually happens at an internal temp of 190 to 210. All pieces of meat are different and may be done at different temps.
    Jim

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    St. Petersburg, Fl.
    Posts
    4,717

    Default

    Jim

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    125

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BYBBQ View Post
    Those are very old guidelines. I would Google the new ones.

    132 may work for some roasts(for slicing) and steaks, but it would make for one tough brisket and a chuck roast would never pull at that temp. Brisket and chuck(for pulled beef) need to pass the probe tender test. That usually happens at an internal temp of 190 to 210. All pieces of meat are different and may be done at different temps.

    That's why I said except brisket. we can all agree long low & slow cooks need to go well beyond that 145 mark to break down connective tissue.

    For me steaks have to pass the finger poke. Otherwise slicing beef roasts i shoot for 128, my absolute highest drop dead or pull temp is 132. But thats for my liking everyone else has different taste
    Webber performer deluxe
    Cinder block smoker
    Cabinet smoker
    Gravity feed 36x24x48 coming soon!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    St. Petersburg, Fl.
    Posts
    4,717

    Default

    Maybe so, but I haven't done a low & slow cook for brisket or pork butts in several years. I do them hot and fast, cooking at around 300 and they come out great. In fact most comp cooks cook their briskets and butts hot & fast now days..
    To each his own

    JMHO_YMMV
    Jim

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. A Pork Stuffed Pork Loin
    By Richtee in forum Pork
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 02-14-2011, 12:17 PM
  2. Pork and Pork timing help!!
    By don04 in forum Pork
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 10-29-2010, 10:41 PM
  3. Sunday Pork...and Pork
    By tomshoots in forum Pork
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 10-27-2010, 08:24 PM
  4. USDA Meat Prep fact sheet
    By Richtee in forum The Pickle Barrel
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-06-2008, 07:23 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.0.1