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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Santa Rosa Beach, Florida
    Posts
    359

    Default Cold Smoking Help Please

    I just got a new book (Meat Smoking and Smokehouse Design by Stanley, Adam and Robert Marianski) and I'm seriously considering doing some cold smoking this winter. But I have a question ....... the book says that cold smoking usually takes place around 70*F. There are some variations but that's the ball park. Now, considering that the danger zone is from 40* to 140* F, and the smoke can take anywhere from several days to several weeks, what keeps the meat from spoiling until the smoke process is complete? And by the way, the book is outstanding. I highly recommend it to anyone interested in smoking. I just don't understand the cold smoke thing. Any help??
    Florida Bill

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Texas Hill country
    Posts
    3,030

    Default

    You should Shoot Cowgirl a Pm She built a Smokehouse and knows her stuff I'm sure she would be happy to get you straitened 'round.
    Be kind to me, it's not my fault I'm a "PORK-A-HOLIC"!!
    *
    *
    MY Blog:Http://acountryboyeats.blogspot.com
    Chargriller Smokin' Pro/SFB
    Webber 22.5"
    Memorial UDS Big Jim

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Charlotte NC
    Posts
    516

    Default

    most, not all, but most cold smoked meats are salt cured prior to smoking. be ita rub or brine. Guessing that the answer has something to do with that. salt...it does the meat good
    "BoB" a leaky Offset Stickburner
    Backwoods G2 Party and G2 Chubby
    UDS

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Central MN
    Posts
    1,603

    Default

    . Its all about the cure, which buys you some time, as well as adds flavor. You can use a brine, salt/sugar rub, Tenderquick/Prauge powder, or a combination. But the key is, you have to cure it, before you smoke it.
    22 inch weber
    20 cubic foot homebuilt smoker
    turkey fryer
    coleman stove
    If it burns, I can cook with it.

  5. #5
    SmokyOkie Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chef schwantz View Post
    . Its all about the cure, which buys you some time, as well as adds flavor. You can use a brine, salt/sugar rub, Tenderquick/Prauge powder, or a combination. But the key is, you have to cure it, before you smoke it.


    Curing removes a whole lot of moisture, and leaves chemicals (salt, etc) behind that will dehydrate any bacterial cells before they can reproduce, thus rendering the meat nearly "spoilproof"

    In the days before refrigeration, meats were smoked not to prevent spoiling, but rather to repel insects. This is not to be confused with smoking meat for flavor, but many think that the popularity of BBQ may have to do with the nostalgic cravings of smoke preserved meats in the minds of the folks that grew up eating them.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Santa Rosa Beach, Florida
    Posts
    359

    Default

    First of all, thanks for the replies. I really appreciate it. So, it sounds like the meat must be cured before hanging in the smoke house. I think the reason I'm hung up on this is that I can remember as a youngster in the south (in the country), everybody had a smoke house. And I don't remember the curing process. So, it sounds like the meat had to be cured either with salt or nitrite/nitrate, which protected it during the smoking process, before hanging in the smoke house. Am I getting any closer?
    Florida Bill

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    forks Washington
    Posts
    289

    Default

    Bill

    yes you are getting closer you can go to morton salt web site and order their book it cost like 7 bucks it has a lot of info on curing meats it should answer some of your questions and help you with all your curing needs
    www'mortonsalt.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Santa Rosa Beach, Florida
    Posts
    359

    Default

    Thanks for the reference Salmonclubber. I ordered the booklet from Morton and it looks like it will certainly help. And by the way, the process is beginning to come back to me. When I was a youngster, we would salt/sugar cure hams, shoulders, side meat etc. and put it in the smoke house. We would make bulk sausage and fry it all out and can it in mason jars. We made scrapple (liver mush), souse meat etc. and used up the whole pig. We didn't make the sausages like salami and other European types so we didn't have the problems with early spoilage. I look forward to getting the booklet from Morton and if I really do get into cold smoking, I'll let you all know.
    Florida Bill

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