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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Tulsa
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  2. #12
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    Oct 2009
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    Denham Springs LA
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    97

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SmokyOkie View Post
    Steakfruit?????

    May not have the name exactly right but SE Asian fruit that smells like rotten meat and considered wonderful by them folk. YUK
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  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    Texas Hill country
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    Dourion is what it is called.
    Be kind to me, it's not my fault I'm a "PORK-A-HOLIC"!!
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    MY Blog:Http://acountryboyeats.blogspot.com
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  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Denham Springs LA
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    97

    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by BluDawg View Post
    Dourion is what it is called.
    I am sure you are correct. I heard it called something like steakfruit or meatfruit by that dude that runs all over the world eating gross stuff on TV. Anyway thanks for the info.
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  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Tulsa
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    Ah yes, the much maligned Durian fruit.



    Personally, I don't think they are bad at all, and in fact I like durian smoothies. they taste like a cross between banana and pineapple to me, with the texture of an avocado. the trick is not to take large bites. There is just too much flavor and richness.

    funny, its about the only thing that Andrew Zimmern couldn't handle, and I kinda like it. I suppose that really illustrates your point.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Tulsa
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    4,976

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    Quote Originally Posted by ShooterRick View Post
    I am sure you are correct. I heard it called something like steakfruit or meatfruit by that dude that runs all over the world eating gross stuff on TV. Anyway thanks for the info.
    I think that's stink fruit.

    http://www.inmagine.com/searchterms/stinkfruit.html

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Pattison, TX
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    Default

    I used to use S&P, garlic and onion powder on just about everything. Over the years, I have experimented with rubs and marinades; store bought and home made. I like just about all of them. Friends and family ask how I acheived certain flavors and I tell them about whatever I used. But honestly I believe that it's more important how you cook than how you season.

    I have a friend that uses nothing but lemon pepper. Another that uses one and only one brisket rub. If he's out of rub he won't even buy a brisket, much less consider using something else. I pointed out the Tony's Creole seas. in his spice cabinet and said "Just use that!" He said no, that's for shrimp. IMHO, you can use anything on brisket.

    My wife likes nothing but sea salt on her steak, on one side only.

    One of the most memorable cooks I ever attended was when I helped a friend clear some land he had just bought. He brought an Old Smokey grill and a pork butt and charcoal. The butt cooked in the OS while we worked on charcoal only, no smoke wood. And BTW, no seasoning whatsoever, not even salt! I thought it was gonna suck. Was I ever wrong! It was delicious!

    Bottom line, play with it and use what YOU like.
    "Once I thought I was wrong, but I was mistaken."
    Tom, smoker of meats and fine cigars
    UDS, Vicking grill


  8. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Denham Springs LA
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    97

    Default

    I agree with all generally. One mans trash is anothers treasure so to speak. I play with new combos all the time. In my small catering buisnesss I only use 2 rubs. One for poultry and another for everything else. Cooking for pay is different though. You must be consistant with the product appealing to the broadest section possible and once you find that stick to it! At home I play with things alot. Hey I love spinach but you may hate it! As I said before taste is subjective.
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  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Broken Arrow OK
    Posts
    502

    Default

    for all the replies. Interesting to see the commonalities and the differences. I'm well aware of "diff'rent strokes for diff'rent folks" in seasoning. I'm more interested in "why do it at all" as opposed to "why I do it the way I do it"...

    I haven't seen much thought on whether the bark inhibits the meat from taking on flavoring from the smoke.

    I pulled this from another thread here...[QUOTE=BigAL;53885]I've used all kinds of rubs and find that I can hardly taste the rub after it's all pulled and mixed together so go w/what ya got, it'll work fine. QUOTE] (italics mine) This sorta addresses part of what I was getting at. Does the rub on the outside actually add that much to the taste? Or does the sprinkling of rub over the meat once it's pulled do just as much?

    One thing that seems to be fairly consistent it that brisket appears to be done with just S&P more than pork. Is this because brisket has its own naturally pleasing taste and pork needs the embellishment? Or is it a geographical thing with many of our members being in the brisket states?

    And by the way, thanks for the education. This stuff is fascinating to me for some reason... I know my next brisket will just plain ol' S&P over pecan.
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  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Denham Springs LA
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    97

    Default

    [quote=lazy;53930] for all the replies. Interesting to see the I haven't seen much thought on whether the bark inhibits the meat from taking on flavoring from the smoke.

    I pulled this from another thread here...
    Quote Originally Posted by BigAL View Post
    I've used all kinds of rubs and find that I can hardly taste the rub after it's all pulled and mixed together so go w/what ya got, it'll work fine. QUOTE] (italics mine) This sorta addresses part of what I was getting at. Does the rub on the outside actually add that much to the taste? Or does the sprinkling of rub over the meat once it's pulled do just as much?

    One thing that seems to be fairly consistent it that brisket appears to be done with just S&P more than pork. Is this because brisket has its own naturally pleasing taste and pork needs the embellishment? Or is it a geographical thing with many of our members being in the brisket states?
    .
    Let me try this one for you. First the bark does not develop immediately and those that foil do so around 150-160 internal temp and continue to braise. The smoke ring and flavor does not seem inhibited at this point and some as do I foil at certain points to controll the amount of smoke flavor and to braise for tenderness and moisture retention. Personally I love the taste of the bark and make sure to mix it in if I am pulling the meat. With a butt many use a finishing sauce that is mixed in after pulling for the same reason; to impart additional flavor. Carolina style pulled pork is the best known example of this. Most rubs once cooked take on a different flavor somewhat from dry in the bottle. Sugars carmelize and such. Flavors meld and the end result is different than from the bottle.

    To increase flavor and moisture I also inject with a carrier such as apple juice mixed with my rub. I do this with all but ribs.

    As to brisket: I have done many briskets and if you think about a slice of brisket and how it is eaten the bark is in about every bite. If ya pull brisket the large surface area of the bark compaired to the thickness say of a flat is mixed in well and add injection to this and you can impart many flavor combinations depending how you season it. S&P is fine if that is the flavor combo you want. As mentioned by someone else; cooking technique is very important and you can vary flavor and smoke by your technique as I mentioned foiling at a certain point.

    Hope this gives food for thought.
    Shooter
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