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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    South of Peculiar, MO
    Posts
    6,734

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    Nope.
    Just don't use galvanized anything to cook in.
    "If you can't smell smoke it ain't a barbeque joint" peculiarmike

    TQJ Plankowner

    "Life's tough.....It's even tougher if you're stupid."
    - John Wayne

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Far Northern California
    Posts
    114

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    Quote Originally Posted by peculiarmike View Post
    So, I called my son down in Ft. Lauderdale. His degree is in metalurgy and powdered metal technology. He tells me -
    The drums are made from cold rolled steel, and it DOES NOT have "pores".
    Cast iron is somewhat porous. But steel is not and will not retain any chemicals.
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris_Harper View Post
    I will check this with an engineer at work (who is a metalurigist <sp?>) and see what he says.
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris_Harper View Post
    Ok, I checked with the guy today, and he says....NOT POROUS.
    Cool . . . that satisfies (for me anyway ) the question on the drums containing . . . pretty much whatever with no lining. Instinctively, after having operated wood-fired boilers for awhile in my past jobs and seeing what a really hot wood fire can do, I would have said that after a couple of good burns that they would be safe. Having this confirmed by not one, but two, metallurgists (sp) is good to know.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ranbo View Post
    The big difference is "food grade" drums are a better guage metal. I would personally do a good burn with the drum before use. The catalogs I have for drum makers state they have two different linings, rust-proof or resin coated.
    So . . . now let's move on to the subject of the resin coated, or as I like to call it, the "dreaded red liner". Now speaking from experience, that liner can take quite a bit of heat and also quite a bit of wire wheeling with the angle grinder and still survive. Trust me on that one. But folks opinion on using barrels with the red liner range from "get it down to bare metal or dont' use it" to "I burned it once and the drum will never get that hot again so it must be okay". There is even an outfit here in a nearby town that sells them made into cookers that are cooking in the grilling temp range (full lit load of Kingsford in the bottom on an upside down disc plate) that don't evey try to remove the liner. The owners response to my question about the liner was "Been doing it that way for years. No one's had any problem yet." How many times have we heard that.

    Okay, now to the question . . . does anyone here know of anyone who can give a definitive answer? I have tried to research it and I can't find any MSDS info on the liner in it's cured state -- only the liquid state.

    Dave
    UDS 1.0a
    Brinkmann Smoke 'N Pit with Afterburner
    Charbroil Masterflame
    Maverick ET-73
    Taylor 1470 Digital Thermometers
    Taylor 9842 Instant Read Thermometer
    Blue Thermapen


  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    South of Peculiar, MO
    Posts
    6,734

    Default

    Burn it out. Take it to the car wash.
    "If you can't smell smoke it ain't a barbeque joint" peculiarmike

    TQJ Plankowner

    "Life's tough.....It's even tougher if you're stupid."
    - John Wayne

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Broken Arrow, OK
    Posts
    1,905

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    Quote Originally Posted by peculiarmike View Post
    Burn it out. Take it to the car wash.
    Hey, Mike. Did I ever tell you about my first wife?



    Ne'ermind. I'll keep it to myself. Strange mood and all.













































    Kev
    GOSM 3405
    UDS - One of a set of twins
    Custom Stick Burner - "Latifah".....(yeah, she's big and beautiful)
    Certified KCBS Judge

    Between two evils, I always pick the one I never tried before.
    -Mae West

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Tulsa
    Posts
    4,976

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DDave View Post
    Cool . . . that satisfies (for me anyway ) the question on the drums containing . . . pretty much whatever with no lining. Instinctively, after having operated wood-fired boilers for awhile in my past jobs and seeing what a really hot wood fire can do, I would have said that after a couple of good burns that they would be safe. Having this confirmed by not one, but two, metallurgists (sp) is good to know.



    So . . . now let's move on to the subject of the resin coated, or as I like to call it, the "dreaded red liner". Now speaking from experience, that liner can take quite a bit of heat and also quite a bit of wire wheeling with the angle grinder and still survive. Trust me on that one. But folks opinion on using barrels with the red liner range from "get it down to bare metal or dont' use it" to "I burned it once and the drum will never get that hot again so it must be okay". There is even an outfit here in a nearby town that sells them made into cookers that are cooking in the grilling temp range (full lit load of Kingsford in the bottom on an upside down disc plate) that don't evey try to remove the liner. The owners response to my question about the liner was "Been doing it that way for years. No one's had any problem yet." How many times have we heard that.

    Okay, now to the question . . . does anyone here know of anyone who can give a definitive answer? I have tried to research it and I can't find any MSDS info on the liner in it's cured state -- only the liquid state.

    Dave
    The red liner is a phenolic coating. thermal decomposition of phenolics can generate extremely toxic byproducts. I wouldn't even consider cooking with any of it left in the drum, especially where the byproducts would be concentrated by cooking in an enclosed environment like a drum.

    Here is a little reference literature.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Far Northern California
    Posts
    114

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SmokyOkie View Post
    The red liner is a phenolic coating. thermal decomposition of phenolics can generate extremely toxic byproducts. I wouldn't even consider cooking with any of it left in the drum, especially where the byproducts would be concentrated by cooking in an enclosed environment like a drum.
    Thank you, Tim. Instinctively I thought it was something like that and wouldn't risk cooking in it. Which is why there is a barrel in my backyard that was burned and wirewheeled and finally I gave up on it. The drum in my avatar was a different drum that I was able to acquire after futzing around with the first one for awhile.

    I may try to burn the other one out again though. I'm thinking a 40 pound bag of mesquite lump on an expanded metal grate 3" off the bottom of the drum with some nice dry oak pallet wood (if I can find it) might work.

    If it doesn't get it, at least it should be fun to watch.

    Dave
    UDS 1.0a
    Brinkmann Smoke 'N Pit with Afterburner
    Charbroil Masterflame
    Maverick ET-73
    Taylor 1470 Digital Thermometers
    Taylor 9842 Instant Read Thermometer
    Blue Thermapen


  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Tulsa
    Posts
    4,976

    Default

    Try a weedburner, but remember, you don't want to breathe the fumes when you burn it, and a particle mask won't help.

  8. #28
    Jackb is offline Allowed to bring in wood for The Pit Jackb is an unknown quantity at this point
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Kearney, Mo.
    Posts
    51

    Default

    interesting thread. How do you burn out a drum?

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Texas Hill country
    Posts
    3,030

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jackb View Post
    interesting thread. How do you burn out a drum?
    Drill the intake holes
    Bust up as many old Shipping Palettes as you can lay your hands on
    Stuff the wood in the Drum
    Squirt it with Charcoal lighter go Plum loopy with it
    Toss in a lit match
    Be kind to me, it's not my fault I'm a "PORK-A-HOLIC"!!
    *
    *
    MY Blog:Http://acountryboyeats.blogspot.com
    Chargriller Smokin' Pro/SFB
    Webber 22.5"
    Memorial UDS Big Jim

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    South of Peculiar, MO
    Posts
    6,734

    Default

    Generally, load a bunch of dry wood in it, whatever ya got long as it isn't treated, and light it. Get away fast.
    Oh. wait...... that's fireworks.
    But that's the way it is generally done. Some folks use a propane weed burner. I tried that but it wasn't the same.
    And the burn out pretty much removes any exterior paint. You can get high temp. paint (header paint) in spray cans at O'Reilly's or most auto parts stores, ain't cheap though.

    Best solution is to use a non-lined drum. Still burn it out though.
    I get drums that have been cleaned and all the paint removed from a dealer here in KC. No burn out, just build it and paint it.
    "If you can't smell smoke it ain't a barbeque joint" peculiarmike

    TQJ Plankowner

    "Life's tough.....It's even tougher if you're stupid."
    - John Wayne

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