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Thread: Hickory Syrup

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    South of Peculiar, MO
    Posts
    6,735

    Default Hickory Syrup

    Anyone tried Hickory Syrup? Looks interesting. Check out the link.
    Also check out the recipes.
    I may order up some out of curiosity.
    They have hickory smoked sea salt also.

    http://homestead.hickoryworks.com/

    If you have tried it what do you think of it?
    "If you can't smell smoke it ain't a barbeque joint" peculiarmike

    TQJ Plankowner

    "Life's tough.....It's even tougher if you're stupid."
    - John Wayne

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    NW Indiana
    Posts
    3,034

    Default

    Excellent thread Mike, I had no idea!!!!! Brown County Indiana!!! I will be ordering some also, along with their BBQ sauce.

    March 2003
    The thick, amber-colored syrup is the sticky stuff of legend. Its smoky, nutty flavor is less sweet than maple, more complex, and hauntingly unique. And the thousands of chefs and home gourmets who count themselves among the converted can tell you that Gordon Jones is definitely not barking up the wrong tree.
    Jones and wife Sherrie Yarling, the country's sole producers of Shagbark Hickory Syrup, live and work on 64-acres of land in Brown County, Indiana that boasts a six-acre lake, and rich groves of hickory, ash, oak and poplar trees.

    But it is the shagbark hickory-specifically the bark-that provides Jones and Yarling their livelihood in the form of the luscious condiment that has palates panting for more.

    Each bottle of the filtered and aged syrup ("like fine wine," says Jones) is like liquid Americana. The process of distilling the extract from the bark dates back to the Native Americans indigenous to the region.

    The origins of the exact recipe are at least 200 years old, passed on to them by a mysterious elderly man buying firewood. He remarked that his great-great-grandmother had made syrup from the bark of the hickory trees. When the man returned for more firewood, Jones-undaunted by a few botched batches-offered to trade the wood for the recipe.

    The couple spent countless hours tweaking the recipe, working out the packaging and distribution. "It was definitely a labor of love," remarked Jones, who moved with Yarling in 1990 from Palm Beach, Florida to cultivate Shiitake mushrooms on the acreage.

    Now, over ten years and as many expansions in production later, Jones and Yarling are still the sole employees of Hickoryworks, where they handle the production, distribution and marketing of the syrup to a growing clienele.

    They also sell a syrup made from the tulip poplars (historically used to flavor spruce beer) plentiful on their property. In contrast, the poplar syrup is very floral in character and far more delicate than the shagbark. In addition, they offer a shagbark barbecue sauce-Brown County BS-that Jones developed.

    Jones is also putting the finishing touches on a cookbook of recipes collected from his customers, chefs and creative home cooks around the country, as well as some he and his wife have developed in their own kitchen.

    The recipes-some of which can be found at their website-use the syrup in desserts (like crème brulee), sauces (like homemade catsup and salad dressings), and as an ingredient in savory dishes from sweet potatoes to salmon. Even cocktails, the Shagbark Julep for one, are included. "It pairs very well with Bourbon," says Jones, who is quick to mention that Julia Child uses that mixture as a glaze on ribs.

    Before Hickoryworks, Yarling was a paralegal for 17 years, and Jones had worn many hats in publishing, advertising, sales, as well as managing hotels and restaurants. "Now, when I wake up in the morning and my feet hit the floor, I'm at work," says Jones. "And my wife is the CEO."

    With business flourishing and so much syrup lying around, it is no wonder life for Gordon Jones is so sweet.
    MEMBER: BERGIE BBQ team 2011, 2012.




  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Central MN
    Posts
    1,603

    Default

    Sounds interesting, but I think I would like to try it before I dish out $20 for a bottle.
    22 inch weber
    20 cubic foot homebuilt smoker
    turkey fryer
    coleman stove
    If it burns, I can cook with it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Tulsa
    Posts
    4,976

    Default

    Brown County Indiana, home of the best fall covered bridge festival in the midwest and home also of Turkey Run State Park if I'm not mistaken.

    Home also to just about the best viewing of fall foliage than one could want.

    I think we have a member that lives near there if not actually there. Perhaps she could shed some light on the subject.

    Hey Copkid!!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    87

    Default

    Brown County is about 30 minutes south of where I live. Turkey Run State Park is actually in the western half of Indiana. Brown county is full of big hills, and is home to many artists and eccentric people (in a good way!) who live off of and create many foods, art, pottery, etc, from natural resources from the land. Prettiest fall foilage is to be seen in Brown Co.! Seems to be running late this year, due to the warm weather.
    Little town outside of Brown Co. State park by the name of Nashville. It is only about 8 city blocks long, but is reminiscint of Gatlinburg, Tn. with tons of little shops and stuff. My husband and I try to make a yearly fall visit when it is just getting chilly, and there is a strong odor of woodsmoke in the air, leaves being crunched under your feet.......It's where I fell in love with the music of Phil Coulter, and the art of Thomas Kincaid..
    Laura

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    NW Indiana
    Posts
    3,034

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SmokyOkie View Post
    Brown County Indiana, home of the best fall covered bridge festival in the midwest yes indeed, it is worth the trip to see!! and home also of Turkey Run State Park if I'm not mistaken. also correct, spent countless hrs there during trip from highschool, not saying I remember all those hrs!! but it is a beautiful park, esp this time of year!!

    Home also to just about the best viewing of fall foliage than one could want. that and parts of Michigan

    I think we have a member that lives near there if not actually there. Perhaps she could shed some light on the subject.

    Hey Copkid!!!
    Another Hoosier, Jesus we're taking over the site. I have not met this Copkid!!! Come on in and say hello!!!
    MEMBER: BERGIE BBQ team 2011, 2012.




  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Tulsa
    Posts
    4,976

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by copkid View Post
    Brown County is about 30 minutes south of where I live. Turkey Run State Park is actually in the western half of Indiana. Brown county is full of big hills, and is home to many artists and eccentric people (in a good way!) who live off of and create many foods, art, pottery, etc, from natural resources from the land. Prettiest fall foilage is to be seen in Brown Co.! Seems to be running late this year, due to the warm weather.
    Little town outside of Brown Co. State park by the name of Nashville. It is only about 8 city blocks long, but is reminiscint of Gatlinburg, Tn. with tons of little shops and stuff. My husband and I try to make a yearly fall visit when it is just getting chilly, and there is a strong odor of woodsmoke in the air, leaves being crunched under your feet.......It's where I fell in love with the music of Phil Coulter, and the art of Thomas Kincaid..
    Laura
    Thomas Kincaid, master of the light!

    Nice of you to drop by for a visit Laura. Good to know you're still alive.

    Can you help us out on this hickory syrup?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    87

    Default

    I don't really know much about the syrup, but I'm sure the extra expense comes from the long process of doing the syrup. It takes alot of tree sap to make even a little bit of syrup, and I'm sure they do it an old fashioned way, using the hickory wood. People down in that area tend to do things the old fashioned way, without the commercial shortcuts.
    In that part of the state, you can drive along a country road for miles without seeing anyone or another car, and all of a sudden you crest a hill, and there are 50 deer hunters standing in the road staring at you as you drive by.........(yeh, it happened to me once.....)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    NW Indiana
    Posts
    3,034

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by copkid View Post
    and all of a sudden you crest a hill, and there are 50 deer hunters standing in the road staring at you as you drive by.........(yeh, it happened to me once.....)
    From time to time. Thanks for the PM will write ya back soon, hoosier!!

    Come pay us a visit more often, we are well worth it!!!!
    MEMBER: BERGIE BBQ team 2011, 2012.




  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    South of Peculiar, MO
    Posts
    6,735

    Default

    Well, I just thought the syrup interesting. And I'm gonna try it.
    Another little place just up the road from Nashville - Bean Blossom. Home of a bluegrass legend and an annual big time bluegrass festival. Pretty much the birthplace of bluegrass.
    I thought Nashville was a neat place, reminded me of Branson, MO before the money grubbers took it over and tried to level the hills. Had killer real homemade ice cream from a 20 qt. White Mountain ice cream maker at a little shop in Nashville.
    Last edited by peculiarmike; 11-06-2008 at 09:17 AM.
    "If you can't smell smoke it ain't a barbeque joint" peculiarmike

    TQJ Plankowner

    "Life's tough.....It's even tougher if you're stupid."
    - John Wayne

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