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Daddeo
06-29-2011, 03:11 PM
3795

I worked at perfecting the BBQ sauce I liked until we moved to OK and discovered that Head County was almost the same (maybe a little better). I quit making my own sauce because Head Country was just so good, cheaper than making my own and far easier. Now I have to make up a sugar free sauce for health reasons so I made a BBQ Sauce Worksheet, attached. None of the recipies are mine and they're put on there for comparison purposes. I'm not sure that I agree will all of them as to the style of sauce they are supposed to be, and they make different quantites of finished product. Its kind of fun and you can make up your own sauce a pretty easy.

I hope some you guys might enjoy playing with it.

Pappy
06-29-2011, 03:25 PM
Thanks, we use the splenda brown sugar instead of the regular.

Vermin99
06-29-2011, 03:41 PM
I'll have to try your sf sauce. I have been buying a local sugar free sauce but its not that great, it needs doctoring up. Thanks for sharing!!

Daddeo
06-29-2011, 04:19 PM
The Sugar Free is still a project in the works for me....please let me know what you wind up with. All of the dishes you post look terrific, expecially your "verde" recipies so I'll be interested to see what you wind up with that is sugar free. I think the Brown Splenda that we can buy here is about 50% actual brown sugar cut with 50% Splenda so i haven't tried it. Have you used Rice Syrup in any applications?

Daddeo
06-29-2011, 05:18 PM
I have learned just today, that although some internet sites may claim the rice syrup is a great alternative to sugar for diabetics, it is not a good alternative to control blood sugar spikes....it does create sugar spikes. I guess I'll back it out of the SF BBQ Sauce recipe and up the Splenda. Perhaps the increased water that will be needed can be made up with diet Dr Pepper or Coke 0.

I'm sorry to do my thinking out loud guys, but I was mis-informed by a website and posted before I learned enough. Never too late to learn, but it can be embarrassing.

PigCicles
06-29-2011, 05:38 PM
Nothing wrong with thinking in writing dude. It's cool that you are helping create a good sauce for diabetics. It's kinda like open source recipes. :thumbs up: :thumbs up:

Vermin99
06-29-2011, 10:23 PM
I have read mixing Stevia and Splenda makes a better tasting sweetener too but haven't tried it. I haven't ventured too much into sauce making be it sugar or sugar free. About the only thing I do is take a comercial sauce and doctor it up a bit.

rugsrme
06-30-2011, 03:31 PM
Very interesting worksheet I think I'll try some of the recipes. I'm not diabetic, but I am trying to alter my diet to cut out sugar and calories, I think this will help.
Thanks

Coke 0.

As far as the Coke 0 ? Just an observation, one winter I left a bottle of it in the bed of my truck and it was 7 deg. Fahrenheit over night and it never froze, didn't even get slushy. I don't know what is in it, but it freaked me out!! I ain't drinking anything that won't freeze unless it has alcohol in it and I don't even drink that very often for that matter.
Take that for what you wish :shrug:

Daddeo
07-12-2011, 01:41 PM
Well folks, I tried the sugar free sauce recipie in the worksheet and I'm sorry to report that it was awful. After 10 or 12 tweeks to salvage it, I concluded that we didn't need a real sweet marinara sauce at our house and poured it down the disposal. I'm going to start over with a very simple sauce to build on; the disposal has been running great ever since.

In any event, my advice would be to replace the sugar free sauce on the worksheet.

PigCicles
07-12-2011, 03:03 PM
Well sorry to hear that, but glad it was you and not me trying it. I could use some disposal cleaner I suppose :msn-wink:

Thanks for the update.

Timbo
07-13-2011, 06:54 AM
Try a product called Agave syrup or Agave nectar. We picked some up on our trip out west. Here is some info I found on it.

The syrup is made from agave plants, which are juiced and filtered so that the resulting liquid is thick and honey-colored. Itís becoming a very popular sugar alternative because not only is it very sweet, but because it has a very low glycemic index. Essentially, this means that it wonít cause your blood sugar to spike like some other high-sugar or high-carbohydrate foods. As far as I know, there arenít any other natural sweeteners with a GI lower than agave syrup. It still has the same number of calories as sugar, though (15 per tsp).

The consistency of agave syrup is somewhere between maple syrup and honey: syrupy, but thin enough that it is very easy to pour. It tastes similar to honey in terms of sweetness and might even be a little bit sweeter. It lacks that signature taste of honey, however, so I would describe it as having a slightly cleaner flavor Ė albeit one with a lot more character than, say, a plain sugar syrup.

Agave syrup can certainly be used in baking, but it cannot be substituted directly for sugar. One problem is that it is sweeter than sugar. Another is that it is a liquid, so it changes the proportions of the recipe. Try starting with a recipe that calls for honey and substitute agave. It will act much the same way, contributing to browning and helping to keep the baked good moist a day or two after baking.

tomshoots
07-13-2011, 05:28 PM
Try a product called Agave syrup or Agave nectar. We picked some up on our trip out west. Here is some info I found on it.

The syrup is made from agave plants, which are juiced and filtered so that the resulting liquid is thick and honey-colored. Itís becoming a very popular sugar alternative because not only is it very sweet, but because it has a very low glycemic index. Essentially, this means that it wonít cause your blood sugar to spike like some other high-sugar or high-carbohydrate foods. As far as I know, there arenít any other natural sweeteners with a GI lower than agave syrup. It still has the same number of calories as sugar, though (15 per tsp).

The consistency of agave syrup is somewhere between maple syrup and honey: syrupy, but thin enough that it is very easy to pour. It tastes similar to honey in terms of sweetness and might even be a little bit sweeter. It lacks that signature taste of honey, however, so I would describe it as having a slightly cleaner flavor Ė albeit one with a lot more character than, say, a plain sugar syrup.

Agave syrup can certainly be used in baking, but it cannot be substituted directly for sugar. One problem is that it is sweeter than sugar. Another is that it is a liquid, so it changes the proportions of the recipe. Try starting with a recipe that calls for honey and substitute agave. It will act much the same way, contributing to browning and helping to keep the baked good moist a day or two after baking.

I'm familiar with agave nectar and it's a great natural sweetener. I love it in coffee or tea, it would no doubt be great in Q sauce. But when I suggested it to my diabetic brother, he said it was a definite no-no. Even with it's lower GI, he can't have it.

BTW, it's also great in Margaritas!:msn-wink:

SmokyOkie
07-13-2011, 08:19 PM
It is also great in the foil with your ribs.