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Smokin
01-14-2008, 04:25 PM
This list is from http://www.eaglequest.com/~bbq/faq2/8.html. Thought it might help anyone wanting to know which wood might work best.

ACACIA - these trees are in the same family as mesquite. When burned in a smoker, acacia has a flavor similar to mesquite but not quite as heavy. A very hot burning wood.
ALDER - Very delicate with a hint of sweetness. Good with fish, pork, poultry, and light-meat game birds.
ALMOND - A sweet smoke flavor, light ash. Good with all meats.
APPLE - Very mild with a subtle fruity flavor, slightly sweet. Good with poultry (turns skin dark brown) and pork.
ASH - Fast burner, light but distinctive flavor. Good with fish and red meats.
BIRCH - Medium-hard wood with a flavor similar to maple. Good with pork and poultry.
CHERRY - Mild and fruity. Good with poultry, pork and beef. Some List members say the cherry wood is the best wood for smoking. Wood from chokecherry trees may produce a bitter flavor.
COTTONWOOD - It is a softer wood than alder and very subtle in flavor. Use it for fuel but use some chunks of other woods (hickory, oak, pecan) for more flavor. Don't use green cottonwood for smoking.
CRABAPPLE - Similar to apple wood.
GRAPEVINES - Tart. Provides a lot of smoke. Rich and fruity. Good with poultry, red meats, game and lamb.
HICKORY - Most commonly used wood for smoking--the King of smoking woods. Sweet to strong, heavy bacon flavor. Good with pork, ham and beef.
LILAC - Very light, subtle with a hint of floral. Good with seafood and lamb.
MAPLE - Smoky, mellow and slightly sweet. Good with pork, poultry, cheese, and small game birds.
MESQUITE - Strong earthy flavor. Good with beef, fish, chicken, and game. One of the hottest burning.
MULBERRY - The smell is sweet and reminds one of apple.
OAK - Heavy smoke flavor--the Queen of smoking wood.

RED OAK is good on ribs

WHITE OAK makes the best coals for longer burning. All oak varieties reported as suitable for smoking. Good with red meat, pork, fish and heavy game.
ORANGE, LEMON and GRAPEFRUIT - Produces a nice mild smoky flavor. Excellent with beef, pork, fish and poultry.
PEAR - A nice subtle smoke flavor. Much like apple. Excellent with chicken and pork.
PECAN - Sweet and mild with a flavor similar to hickory. Tasty with a subtle character. Good with poultry, beef, pork and cheese. Pecan is an all-around superior smoking wood.
SWEET FRUIT WOODS - APRICOT, PLUM, PEACH, NECTARINE - Great on most white or pink meats, including chicken, turkey, pork and fish. The flavor is milder and sweeter than hickory.
WALNUT - ENGLISH and BLACK - Very heavy smoke flavor, usually mixed with lighter woods like almond, pear or apple. Can be bitter if used alone. Good with red meats and game.

BBQ List members report that wood from the following trees is suitable for smoking: BAY, CARROTWOOD, KIAWE, MADRONE, MANZANITA, GUAVA and OLIVE. The ornamental varieties of fruit trees (i. e. pear and cherry) are also suitable for smoking.

Other Internet sources list the wood from the following trees as suitable for smoking: BEECH, BUTTERNUT, FIG, GUM, CHESTNUT, HACKBERRY, PIMIENTO, PERSIMMON, and WILLOW.

Red Apple Guy
01-20-2008, 09:11 PM
Good info. I've actually got some fig here. Used it once and liked it.

Sassafrass and mulberry I've used too. Sassafrass has a root beer flavor.

Normal woods for me are Apple, Oak and Pecan.

Red Apple Guy

Kew_el_steve
01-21-2008, 09:26 AM
I've used Sweet Gum too. Middle of the road, neutral flavor.

MichChef
08-31-2010, 08:49 AM
Has anyone ever answered the Russian Olive question? I've seen folks discuss it on other forums but it seems like no one has tried smoking with it. Lord knows it's plentiful enough as it grows like a weed in a lot of the country.

Yay, or Nay?

SmokeN
08-31-2010, 09:42 AM
:sign0092: for posting this! My MIL is having her birch tree taken down next month and she is giving us the wood. I wasnt sure if I could use it for smoking, now I know I can!

MichChef
08-31-2010, 02:24 PM
:sign0092: for posting this! My MIL is having her birch tree taken down next month and she is giving us the wood. I wasnt sure if I could use it for smoking, now I know I can!


Not having smoked with birch, I don't know for sure, but I'd remove the bark from it before smokin. I have used the bark from.downed trees to start a lot of fires while camping and it gives off a pretty thick black smoke.

cabinetmaker
08-31-2010, 03:52 PM
I've never cooked with birch, but have with maple many times. Soft maple that is. Not hard rock maple. Birch is hard like hard maple. I glue a piece of birch and hard maple together and you won't be able to tell the difference (unless your eye is as trained as mine:msn-wink:). Maple has a lot of sugars, which birch doesn't. I think I would do a test cook with some brats or something first just to see what it does.

Toast
10-29-2010, 08:09 PM
Well, I was just getting ready to ask a question about using Red Oak for smoking. Looks like my question has already been answered after reading this post. My firewood guy delivered my wood today and we talked about it. He said it works very well. I also have some white oak now.

Anyone have thoughts on using oak as a smoke wood?

SmokyOkie
10-29-2010, 11:08 PM
You might search out a thread where Capt Dan and I beat the subject to a pulp.

I will not even consider using the red oak that grows around here, but many swear by the red oak that grows where they are.

I will/do burn white oak, and in parts of Texas, post oak ( a type of white oak) is the wood of choice.

tomshoots
04-12-2011, 07:50 PM
This list is from http://www.eaglequest.com/~bbq/faq2/8.html. Thought it might help anyone wanting to know which wood might work best.

ACACIA - these trees are in the same family as mesquite. When burned in a smoker, acacia has a flavor similar to mesquite but not quite as heavy. A very hot burning wood.
ALDER - Very delicate with a hint of sweetness. Good with fish, pork, poultry, and light-meat game birds.
ALMOND - A sweet smoke flavor, light ash. Good with all meats.
APPLE - Very mild with a subtle fruity flavor, slightly sweet. Good with poultry (turns skin dark brown) and pork.
ASH - Fast burner, light but distinctive flavor. Good with fish and red meats.
BIRCH - Medium-hard wood with a flavor similar to maple. Good with pork and poultry.
CHERRY - Mild and fruity. Good with poultry, pork and beef. Some List members say the cherry wood is the best wood for smoking. Wood from chokecherry trees may produce a bitter flavor.
COTTONWOOD - It is a softer wood than alder and very subtle in flavor. Use it for fuel but use some chunks of other woods (hickory, oak, pecan) for more flavor. Don't use green cottonwood for smoking.
CRABAPPLE - Similar to apple wood.
GRAPEVINES - Tart. Provides a lot of smoke. Rich and fruity. Good with poultry, red meats, game and lamb.
HICKORY - Most commonly used wood for smoking--the King of smoking woods. Sweet to strong, heavy bacon flavor. Good with pork, ham and beef.
LILAC - Very light, subtle with a hint of floral. Good with seafood and lamb.
MAPLE - Smoky, mellow and slightly sweet. Good with pork, poultry, cheese, and small game birds.
MESQUITE - Strong earthy flavor. Good with beef, fish, chicken, and game. One of the hottest burning.
MULBERRY - The smell is sweet and reminds one of apple.
OAK - Heavy smoke flavor--the Queen of smoking wood.

RED OAK is good on ribs

WHITE OAK makes the best coals for longer burning. All oak varieties reported as suitable for smoking. Good with red meat, pork, fish and heavy game.
ORANGE, LEMON and GRAPEFRUIT - Produces a nice mild smoky flavor. Excellent with beef, pork, fish and poultry.
PEAR - A nice subtle smoke flavor. Much like apple. Excellent with chicken and pork.
PECAN - Sweet and mild with a flavor similar to hickory. Tasty with a subtle character. Good with poultry, beef, pork and cheese. Pecan is an all-around superior smoking wood.
SWEET FRUIT WOODS - APRICOT, PLUM, PEACH, NECTARINE - Great on most white or pink meats, including chicken, turkey, pork and fish. The flavor is milder and sweeter than hickory.
WALNUT - ENGLISH and BLACK - Very heavy smoke flavor, usually mixed with lighter woods like almond, pear or apple. Can be bitter if used alone. Good with red meats and game.

BBQ List members report that wood from the following trees is suitable for smoking: BAY, CARROTWOOD, KIAWE, MADRONE, MANZANITA, GUAVA and OLIVE. The ornamental varieties of fruit trees (i. e. pear and cherry) are also suitable for smoking.

Other Internet sources list the wood from the following trees as suitable for smoking: BEECH, BUTTERNUT, FIG, GUM, CHESTNUT, HACKBERRY, PIMIENTO, PERSIMMON, and WILLOW.



I used walnut once...only once. Smelled great while cookin'. Similar to pecan. But it was nasty strong! Use sparingly.

Pappy
04-13-2011, 06:05 AM
I didn't know you could smoke with soft maple. We have tons of that in this neck of the woods. People can't give the stuff away. I was thinking that would make my hickory suppy go farther by mixing some of that in for heat.