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View Full Version : Cold Smoking Help Please



Florida Bill
10-29-2010, 05:00 PM
I just got a new book (Meat Smoking and Smokehouse Design by Stanley, Adam and Robert Marianski) and I'm seriously considering doing some cold smoking this winter. But I have a question ....... the book says that cold smoking usually takes place around 70*F. There are some variations but that's the ball park. Now, considering that the danger zone is from 40* to 140* F, and the smoke can take anywhere from several days to several weeks, what keeps the meat from spoiling until the smoke process is complete? And by the way, the book is outstanding. I highly recommend it to anyone interested in smoking. I just don't understand the cold smoke thing. Any help??

BluDawg
10-29-2010, 06:42 PM
You should Shoot Cowgirl a Pm She built a Smokehouse and knows her stuff I'm sure she would be happy to get you straitened 'round.

Umpa
10-29-2010, 07:54 PM
most, not all, but most cold smoked meats are salt cured prior to smoking. be ita rub or brine. Guessing that the answer has something to do with that. salt...it does the meat good

chef schwantz
10-29-2010, 09:04 PM
:whathesaid:. Its all about the cure, which buys you some time, as well as adds flavor. You can use a brine, salt/sugar rub, Tenderquick/Prauge powder, or a combination. But the key is, you have to cure it, before you smoke it.

SmokyOkie
10-29-2010, 11:01 PM
:whathesaid:. Its all about the cure, which buys you some time, as well as adds flavor. You can use a brine, salt/sugar rub, Tenderquick/Prauge powder, or a combination. But the key is, you have to cure it, before you smoke it.

:whathesaid:

Curing removes a whole lot of moisture, and leaves chemicals (salt, etc) behind that will dehydrate any bacterial cells before they can reproduce, thus rendering the meat nearly "spoilproof"

In the days before refrigeration, meats were smoked not to prevent spoiling, but rather to repel insects. This is not to be confused with smoking meat for flavor, but many think that the popularity of BBQ may have to do with the nostalgic cravings of smoke preserved meats in the minds of the folks that grew up eating them.

Florida Bill
10-30-2010, 08:57 AM
First of all, thanks for the replies. I really appreciate it. So, it sounds like the meat must be cured before hanging in the smoke house. I think the reason I'm hung up on this is that I can remember as a youngster in the south (in the country), everybody had a smoke house. And I don't remember the curing process. So, it sounds like the meat had to be cured either with salt or nitrite/nitrate, which protected it during the smoking process, before hanging in the smoke house. Am I getting any closer?

salmonclubber
10-30-2010, 09:28 AM
Bill

yes you are getting closer you can go to morton salt web site and order their book it cost like 7 bucks it has a lot of info on curing meats it should answer some of your questions and help you with all your curing needs
www'mortonsalt.com

Florida Bill
10-30-2010, 12:53 PM
Thanks for the reference Salmonclubber. I ordered the booklet from Morton and it looks like it will certainly help. And by the way, the process is beginning to come back to me. When I was a youngster, we would salt/sugar cure hams, shoulders, side meat etc. and put it in the smoke house. We would make bulk sausage and fry it all out and can it in mason jars. We made scrapple (liver mush), souse meat etc. and used up the whole pig. We didn't make the sausages like salami and other European types so we didn't have the problems with early spoilage. I look forward to getting the booklet from Morton and if I really do get into cold smoking, I'll let you all know.