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bftownes
05-01-2008, 03:54 PM
I have been known a long time for my grilled steaks and margaritas. Smoking is fairly new to me. I am a full-time RVer and we live in our motorhome, so space is limited. My Weber Baby Q has been very good to me. I have been spending a lot of time reading these various forums and couldnt stand it any longer.

I bought a bone-on, 4 lb pork loin and decided that I could try to smoke it on the Baby Q. I used some Weber rub and made a base out of molasses, mustard and the Weber rub.

I placed the meat on the grill along with a small glass of water and some soaked hickory chips. I cooked it for two hours with the grill at its lowest setting. I also had the roast elevated off the grill on a tin pie plate.

After two hours, I took the temp of the meat and it was around 140, but it didnt look done to me. I cooked it one more hour.

The result was a fair taste, but pretty dry and over done. :ack2: Was this because the heat was too high (meaning the Baby Q is not the tool for this)? I read on other forums that the temp reaches 160 and the meat is moist.

I plan to get a GOSM or WSM and try to carry it on my motorhome. I do have an RV pad with hookups in Rockport Texas and have a Weber Q 300 in my shed. I can store the GOSM or WSM there.

:sign0092: for any tips.

Barry
Q100
Q300

PigCicles
05-01-2008, 04:30 PM
Hi Barry, Those loins can be tricky sometimes. They have a tendancy to want to dry out. Do you know how hot your grill was? It could be that it was a little hot. Maybe next time try to inject the loin with a marinade and see if you can drop your cooking temp down a little.

If your internal temp of the meat was too high that would cause it to dry out also. Do you have a wired temperature probe? If not check into the Oregon Scientific probes that have helped sponser this site.

The WSM would probably be the easiest to carry on the RV. But both are good units.

Q-N-Brew
05-01-2008, 04:39 PM
Welcome to The Joint bftownes. It's always good to have new members. We're looking forward to seeing your posts. If possible try to bring some pix of your cooks and maybe of some of your travels.

Enjoy the forum.

SmokyOkie
05-01-2008, 07:12 PM
Welcome to The Joint BFT! Why not stop by the "C'mon in and sit down" forum and give everybody a big hello!

Pork loins do have a tendency to be tight and dry these day ever since pork producers have opted to go "the other white meat" route. they've kinda ruined pork the way Tyson and them have ruined chicken.

Back before all that pork had enough marbling that it would not be dry even if cooked to 165. If you want to be safe these days, 145 is about as high as you can go and still be sure it won't be dry. Foil it and rest it for about 30 minute and it will be done and shouldn't be too dry.

High temps shouldn't be a problem unless you go over 350 and so long as you don't cook direct.

You do know the difference between direct and indirect cooking don't you? If not, say so and we'll give you some good instruction.

Bassman
05-01-2008, 08:23 PM
Welcome to the forum, Barry! You have come to the right place to learn about smoking. I'm sure it won't be long and you'll be posting Qview of all the smokes. Good luck.

TX Sandman
05-01-2008, 11:39 PM
Howdy, Barry! Welcome to the Joint!

Like PC and Okie have said, today's pork is very easy to dry out. I have a couple of questions for you that may give us an idea of what happened.

First, do you know what temp your Baby Q was cooking at? What you might want to do is get a small oven thermometer. That way, the next time you smoke on the Q, you'll have an idea of the cooking temp.

Second, you said the meat at 2 hrs was around 140 internal. Did you happen to check the temp after that last hour?

For me, I tend to cook most pork to 140-145 internal (picnics/butts are an exception). From there, carryover heat will keep the meat cooking for a while. While the government recommends cooking pork to 160, I find if I take it off at that temp, it's way too dry. By pulling it off early, I'll tend to have it finish where I want, not overcooked.

One trick you can try is to brine the pork before cooking it. Basically, this is soaking it in a salt water solution. This adds some moisture to the meat, which makes it juicier and more able to withstand being overcooked.

Please don't let this turn you off of smoking. It sounds like your Baby Q can do the job, but it may need a little tweaking. Hopefully this helped.

Red Apple Guy
05-02-2008, 07:08 AM
Barry,
Your indirect cook on a baby Q is creative.
I tote my WSM around for cooks and while that's not the easiest thing to do (heavy and greasy), it is doable and it's great to cook on.
RAG

SmokyOkie
05-02-2008, 09:39 AM
. While the government recommends cooking pork to 160, I find if I take it off at that temp, it's way too dry. By pulling it off early, I'll tend to have it finish where I want, not overcooked.

One trick you can try is to brine the pork before cooking it. Basically, this is soaking it in a salt water solution. This adds some moisture to the meat, which makes it juicier and more able to withstand being overcooked.

Please don't let this turn you off of smoking. It sounds like your Baby Q can do the job, but it may need a little tweaking. Hopefully this helped.

Here are the USDA recommended minimum safe internal temperatures:
Recommended Safe Minimum Internal Temperatures

Steaks & Roasts - 145 F
Fish - 145 F
Pork - 160 F
Ground Beef - 160 F
Egg Dishes - 160 F
Chicken Breasts - 165 F
Whole Poultry - 165 FYou'll note that steaks and roasts (I assume they mean beef) are recommended @ 145 which would be a hard medium bordering on well done. I don't know why they use that #, but obviously most good steakhouses would be out of business if they refused to cook steaks any less done than that.

They fer about fork used to be trichinosis (small cystic larvae that are absorbed through the pigs feet and end up in the muscle). If the cysts were not killed by cooking, they would end up in the muscle of the pig eater causing dire illness and even death.

Since nearly all pork these days is grown in confinements, there is no trichinosis threat in that meat (wild or non confinement grown pork would be a different story).

That being said,my point is that there is really no more reason that today's pork cannot be safely eaten cooked to the same temperatures as beef if your tastes dictate. Mine do not. 150 is about as rare as I like.

TX Sandman
05-02-2008, 09:52 AM
Here are the USDA recommended minimum safe internal temperatures:

:blushing: Guess I forgot to add the link I found. It has other good info, so I'll add that here.

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Is_It_Done_Yet/Brochure_Text/index.asp


That being said,my point is that there is really no more reason that today's pork cannot be safely eaten cooked to the same temperatures as beef if your tastes dictate. Mine do not. 150 is about as rare as I like.

I'm the same way. I know some folks that like their pork very pink, but I can't get past my upbringing. Y'know, "Pork has to be cooked until it's all white to be safe." I'm a little better than that, but I know my parents eat a *lot* of dried-out pork.

Barry, I hope all this is helping you. :msn-wink:

Red Apple Guy
05-02-2008, 10:05 AM
I believe that if you cook any part of any animal so that the outside surface of the part is 160F or above, it is safe to eat even if the internal temp is less (rare). If the outside of the part is in the inside of the product you are cooking (like ground meat or stuffed meats), the whole product needs to be 160F or above. Now, I've always treated pork as the exception, but the info above may have cleared that up for me.

bftownes
05-02-2008, 11:58 PM
Hmm, good advice on the loins. Quite frankly, I dont yet know the difference in butts, loins, etc. I learn fast.

I do realize that the Weber Q100 is not designed for low and slow or even smoking somethin', but I was desperate to try some of the stuff I had bee reading. I dont know the temp, but certain it was way too high, even at the lowest setting.

Some friends arrived in the campground today who are also full-time RVers. We went to shop that carries a good selection of Weber. They bought a Baby Q. It is the best grill going for those with limited space and storage.

Thanks again for your reply and good advice:sign0092:

Barry





Hi Barry, Those loins can be tricky sometimes. They have a tendancy to want to dry out. Do you know how hot your grill was? It could be that it was a little hot. Maybe next time try to inject the loin with a marinade and see if you can drop your cooking temp down a little.

If your internal temp of the meat was too high that would cause it to dry out also. Do you have a wired temperature probe? If not check into the Oregon Scientific probes that have helped sponser this site.

The WSM would probably be the easiest to carry on the RV. But both are good units.

bftownes
05-03-2008, 12:06 AM
Thanks, it was a little creative and I did take pics. I will try to post them soon.

I want to thank all you guys for the replies. I tend to wanna say "thanks" to every post, but it probably annoys some folks. So.....thanks to all of you and I read each one.

I have all the attributes of a good Q cook.....I love cold beer and other adult beverages and I love to shoot the breeze and drink cold beer into the night. All I need now is some know-how and experience.

Thanks again to all of you.

Barry




Barry,
Your indirect cook on a baby Q is creative.
I tote my WSM around for cooks and while that's not the easiest thing to do (heavy and greasy), it is doable and it's great to cook on.
RAG


Howdy, Barry! Welcome to the Joint!

Like PC and Okie have said, today's pork is very easy to dry out. I have a couple of questions for you that may give us an idea of what happened.

First, do you know what temp your Baby Q was cooking at? What you might want to do is get a small oven thermometer. That way, the next time you smoke on the Q, you'll have an idea of the cooking temp.

Second, you said the meat at 2 hrs was around 140 internal. Did you happen to check the temp after that last hour?

For me, I tend to cook most pork to 140-145 internal (picnics/butts are an exception). From there, carryover heat will keep the meat cooking for a while. While the government recommends cooking pork to 160, I find if I take it off at that temp, it's way too dry. By pulling it off early, I'll tend to have it finish where I want, not overcooked.

One trick you can try is to brine the pork before cooking it. Basically, this is soaking it in a salt water solution. This adds some moisture to the meat, which makes it juicier and more able to withstand being overcooked.

Please don't let this turn you off of smoking. It sounds like your Baby Q can do the job, but it may need a little tweaking. Hopefully this helped.

TX Sandman
05-03-2008, 02:20 AM
Hmm, good advice on the loins. Quite frankly, I dont yet know the difference in butts, loins, etc. I learn fast.

I had a site that listed some of cuts and locations on the hog. But you'll pick it up soon enough.


I have all the attributes of a good Q cook.....I love cold beer and other adult beverages and I love to shoot the breeze and drink cold beer into the night. All I need now is some know-how and experience.

http://bestsmileys.com/drinking/2.gif Yep, you'll fit in just fine 'round here!