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BlazerQue
03-18-2008, 07:47 PM
Have a couple of boneless/skinless turkey breast tenderloins that I plan to cook within the next few days. I'd appreciate seasoning suggestions.

I'm thinking that I will brine these for a few hours then sear and finish indirect on the Weber.

SmokyOkie
03-19-2008, 10:42 AM
Do ya like Cajun? Paul Prudhomme's Poultry Magic is always a winner.

One of my faves is to chop up some fresh herbs (take your pick, but rosemary and marjoram are a couple of our SOPs), and make a slurry w/ honey then rub up under the skin. It also doesn't hurt to make a couple of lengthwise slits and insert some of the slurry. Keep the honey off the outside of the bird though or it'll blacken up and uglify the meat.

I would recommend a reverse sear for a better end appearance. That is, smoke the breast indirect until almost done, then crisp the skin. If you cook hot enough, you may not need to do any direct at all. You can always add it, but its tough to take it away.

Show us what you get.

BlazerQue
03-19-2008, 02:34 PM
Do ya like Cajun? Paul Prudhomme's Poultry Magic is always a winner.

One of my faves is to chop up some fresh herbs (take your pick, but rosemary and marjoram are a couple of our SOPs), and make a slurry w/ honey then rub up under the skin. It also doesn't hurt to make a couple of lengthwise slits and insert some of the slurry. Keep the honey off the outside of the bird though or it'll blacken up and uglify the meat.

I would recommend a reverse sear for a better end appearance. That is, smoke the breast indirect until almost done, then crisp the skin. If you cook hot enough, you may not need to do any direct at all. You can always add it, but its tough to take it away.

Show us what you get.

These are skinless tenderloins:

http://www.honeysucklewhite.com/product.do?productId=128

SmokyOkie
03-19-2008, 03:59 PM
These are skinless tenderloins:

http://www.honeysucklewhite.com/product.do?productId=128



:oops: Guess I need to learn to read.

If that's the case, I'd spin some garlic in some olive oil in the spice grinder (or blender), marinate for a couple hours, the season w/ Seafood Magic.

John DOH
03-20-2008, 08:07 PM
Just to throw in an idea here, you've got boneless skinless filets here, that will have next to no fat on them.

Now maybe that's your point; to get an ulyta low fat result, but if its not, I'd try "lardooning" those breasts by piercing them with a boning knife and adding small bits of bacon/bacon fat into the holes.

Likewise, you could wind them and pin in place strips of "fatty bacon" around them (you can discard the bacopn after cooking; we're just after the fats to keep the meat relatively moist)

When " Lardooning", you could also insert bits of Rosemary or your favoured herbs and spices...a "big" fan of brining as a means of flavouring and keeping moisture in the meat, I endorse this idea wholeheartedly; cranberry juice in the brine would seem a good start...

John

BA_LoKo
03-20-2008, 08:19 PM
John, I have trouble reading your text. I mean no offense, but the default works for me. I reckon I'm getting old. lol (Honey, hand me my bifocals)

BA_LoKo
03-20-2008, 08:24 PM
To answer your question, BlazerQue, I'd throw something simple on them. I'm thinking lemon pepper, cayenne, a touch of paprika, garlic powder, and perhaps a touch of an apple spritz to perhaps maintain moisture. Other than that, I'd just smoke it like I would a chicken. You won't disappointed in whatever you do, unless you smoke it over pine. :smack: :roflmaoha0:

BlazerQue
03-20-2008, 08:30 PM
Whatever I do, I need to do them in the next couple of days. I'm pretty sure I'll brine them and grill them indirect after a sear, but I'm halfway temped to cook them in a dutch oven with some chicken stock and rice.

BA_LoKo
03-20-2008, 08:44 PM
Brining is an outstanding idea. I've had great success with that method. For me, I'd be tempted to go indirect to begin with and then crank the heat at the end to crisp up the skin. I must say that the DO idea would work quite well too. Please know that either method will produce a bit different result, and both quite tasty.

Don't forget to take pics!

John DOH
03-20-2008, 08:44 PM
There, I changed the fonts so you could read it more easily!

Sorry about that!

John

BlazerQue
03-20-2008, 09:00 PM
Brining is an outstanding idea. I've had great success with that method. For me, I'd be tempted to go indirect to begin with and then crank the heat at the end to crisp up the skin. I must say that the DO idea would work quite well too. Please know that either method will produce a bit different result, and both quite tasty.

Don't forget to take pics!

These are skinless.

BA_LoKo
03-20-2008, 09:05 PM
Thank you very much, brother.

You've got my attention on "lardooning". I suppose I could google that, but can you explain that?

Kev

John DOH
03-20-2008, 09:08 PM
The Bacardi is making me think and "scheme" even as the weather in Canada improves to where we could "find" the grill from where it was left last fall...

But if I had turkey breasts on hand and thawed out today, I'd definitely be looking at brining them! Given a weight of meat, of about 4-5 lbs, about 2 quarts of cranberry juice, about 1/3 cup of Sea Salt, a half cup or better of Maple Syrup, rosemary, garlic, basil, thyme and "such" for herbs, brought to a low boil, then add another quart or so of frozen chicken, or turkey or veggie "stock" to cool the brine, and into the plastic bucket and let it sit for about 12 hours, then a really thorough rinse in a collander...

Stab them all over with a boning knife, fairly deeply, and "lardoon" them with bacon, bacon fat, prosciutto, rosemary and so on, coat with dry flour, and then quickly sear them in a cast iron pan, for about a minute, just to get a bit of a "sear", then dress them with bacon strips and toothpicks holding it all in place, then off to the smoker...

Alder, maple, hickory, apple...lots of choices for "smoke" to choose from!

"Doneness" to me would be about 155*, allowing them 20-30 minutes to "convect" up to 160-165*...should be pretty juicy at that point!

Okay, if I was geting "fancy", I'd butterfly them, stuff with spinach and bacon bits and Asiago or Gruyere cheese, but my imagination is starting to run away with me...

John

BA_LoKo
03-20-2008, 09:23 PM
John, tell us about this "lardoon" stuff, please.

John DOH
03-20-2008, 09:49 PM
Hi Kevin

"Lardooning" is a French cooking method that isreally pretty good.

You get a "dry" cut of meat, like pork tenderloin, or, in this case, boneless, skinless turkey or chicken breast that is pretty "naked" of a retaining membrane, like skin or bone, and, to keep it "juicy" you "add fat".

Now, you could wrap it in fat (as witness my thoughts on spinning bacon strips around it, pinning them in place, but that's not putting the good tasting "fats" into the meat itself (you'll appreciate that none of this will "penetrate", just burn or drip off)

So some Froggie "genius" of abour 2 or 300 years ago decided to take bits of pork fat (God Bless Emeril!) and cut holes into the meat, and physically stuff the fat into the threads of the meat, where it HAD to penetrate and be retained. Likewise, stuffing spices or herbs into such "stab points" (think "garlic slivers" or rosemary leaves!) would cause the flavours to be infused into the meat itself.
Like most "brilliant" things, its totally "simple", but for us "wanna be chefs" its easily done, and a wonderful way to insert fats into otherwise dry, extra-lean, or "fatless" cuts of beef, pork, lamb, or, as in this case, turkey.

Otherwise cooking turkey, I like to keep the bones in, as they add a lot of flavur, and are simple to pull out; the skin keeps the fats from sliding out and if you don't like skin, you can alays remove it...but if you want the extra flavour, keep the bones and skin on the meat (makes it much cheaper to buy, too!) and simply lift the sking from the meat and stuff in your spices, salts, herbs and, say, EVOO? The fat has little or no means of "escape" and must stay with the meat...

With pork or beefthe outside edges with always "crisp and contract", retaining the lardoon, garlic sliver or herb/spice stuffing within (the challenge may be getting them buried deep enough!) and to equally infuse the meat with those "extra flavours"

Cover a whole chicken with garlic and thyme, and the only part that may give any such flavour is the skin itself, as the skin is non-permeable to the spice or herb.

Think of stuffing a "Tic-Tac" mint cany inside a piece of meat, where it cannot be expelled during the cooking process...it'll be pretty much dissolved at the end of cooking, but everything with an inch or an inch and a half will stink of peppermint. Take that over to the more welcome "fat" or "herbs" and you've got a "winning technique"!

Am I making sense?

John

BA_LoKo
03-20-2008, 09:53 PM
Thank you, John. I'll try that!

BlazerQue
03-20-2008, 10:02 PM
Stuffing bacon inside certainly is an interesting idea, and I may have to do that at some point. Would you suggest doing so along with brining or in place of brining?

I'm thinking I might go Southwest with these. I can sweeten the brine with some agave syrup and season with some chili powder and maybe some paprika. For the fire, I could use the Natures mesquite lump. I'm concerned that all of this might be a bit strong though.

John DOH
03-20-2008, 10:10 PM
Have some "fun"!

Do some "individual" pieces, one with nothing, another with a spacing, of, say 1" and another with a spacing of 2", with or without herbs or fats (ie do one pice with herbs only, another fats only, and a third with both) and so on.

Then do a "blind taste testing" (ie get your wife or family and friends to taste and give reaction to each kind) to find the "taste" that you want to arrive at.

"Regionality", let alone the different herbs, spices, rubs, woods, etc will put the results all over the map, but I'd bet you'll be pleased and proud of some of the results, at getting out there on the edge and trying something "different"!

(You have my permission to keep it a secret from the relatives and neighbours for up to one year!)

LOL!

John

John DOH
03-20-2008, 10:24 PM
BlazerQue, stuffing a bit of bacon into a turkey breast (much less a pork tenderloin) will never, ever, compensate for brining them!

Brining is a fave of mine, so I have a natural "prejudice" towards doing so, that is simply "my taste", that may or may not meet with yours or Kevin's.

You'll appreciate that my access to agave syrup is about the same as yours to true "maple syrup" that is erupting from countless millions of maple trees at this point up here, its a "staple" for us as chipotles are to you!

Likewise, where i've "done" chicken with mesquite, I find it a little "strong" (but with beef its my fave!); I use the alternates (love hickory!) as I can get the moist and fine textured poultry to turn pink/red like ham, and be what we "Canuckleheads" refr to as "smoked" turkey, etc...

I will always enjoy going down to the southern and western Statesand learning their techniques and recipes (as seldom as that gets to happen!) but up here we get defeated by the absence of those critically "fresh" herbs, spices and other "components" you guys take for granted...

DAMN!

If you guys turn out to "real 'Buds'" I'll have to send you some maple syrup, wild rice and West Coast Smoked Salmon, if only to keep you in line with how we Cdns do some of our BBQ things...

John

BA_LoKo
03-21-2008, 01:01 AM
from JohnDOH " I will always enjoy going down to the southern and western Statesand learning their techniques and recipes"

You're most welcome down in my part of the country every time. We've got all of that agave juice most handy for any occasion, but we're short on that maple stuff. You can send that anytime you're ready. While I don't really have any craving for anything sweet, my Dad would really enjoy your syrup.

Now, about that smoked salmon............ :thumbs up:

John DOH
03-21-2008, 10:26 PM
Slide down the Forum a notch or two, and you'll find a "DiY" method on smoking salmon, even if I admit the half pound bought package just kicks butt...

John

creepyrat
03-22-2008, 12:35 AM
very intersting thanks for the lessons john doh (http://www.theqjoint.com/forum/member.php?u=60)

BlazerQue
03-24-2008, 09:55 PM
Well, I started not to take pics as I pretty much wish this one hadn't taken place. The cook just wasn't any fun at all. First, I mixed up a brine of salt and agave nectar, but I managed to still a good bit of it and didn't have time to mix up more as a buddy was dropping by the house. I had enough left to do the job though.

I didn't have enough of the Nature's mesquite left for this cook; so, I decided to use some of the Original Charcoal Company lump that I had. That stuff sure sparks a lot. Somehow, I managed to burn my hand while fooling with the charcoal.

In addition to grilling the turkey breast, I baked an Australian damper, which is pretty much a big, dense biscuit, in my 8" camp oven.

Here is the damper:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/legacy38/food/IMG_3133.jpg

My little girl loved the damper. She ate both end pieces and half of another piece that I had on my plate.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/legacy38/food/IMG_3136.jpg

The turkey breast turned out okay. I seared it and then moved to it an area with no coals for the rest of the cook. Near the ed, I wrapped each piece in foil. They were okay. I won't be rushing out to cook these again. If I do, I think I'll do a more true indirect cook or do them in my camp or dutch oven and make gravy with the drippings.

I ended up seasoning with some fresh ground tellichery black pepper.

BlazerQue
03-25-2008, 04:06 PM
It would appear that I used too much milk in the damper. I'll have to try it again soon.

californiasmokin
02-26-2010, 08:03 PM
Lardooning?
Never tried the fat or bacon.Interesting!

SmokyOkie
02-26-2010, 10:04 PM
It would appear that I used too much milk in the damper. I'll have to try it again soon.

that damper looks great to me. How 'bout a recipe?


Lardooning?
Never tried the fat or bacon.Interesting!

I have heard of pork "Lardons". I think John is just speaking Canuck on us.:msn-wink: