PDA

View Full Version : smoked turkey breast where to check temp?



lazy
04-22-2009, 11:26 PM
I have a breast going into brine in a 1/2 hour or so, for smoking tomorrow. I'll rinse it, dry it, put some rub under the skin, some EVOO on the skin, maybe some butter and what-not in the cavity. I figure I'll run it about 250 or so using the SFB ("recommended" temps seem to be all over the board around here). It's about 8.5 lbs, so I'm not too concerned about too much time spent below 140. Either applewood, if I get around to picking some up, or hickory.

I've two questions I hope somebody can answer prior to me getting the bird on the grill in the afternoon:

1. Just where should I check the temp? No thigh or anything, so just stick it into the breast about 1/2 way? Pull at 165?

2. I'm assuming that with all the nasties in poultry, it shouldn't be brought up to room temp prior to cooking. Out of the fridge, clean, rub, and into the smoker?

Thanks.

peculiarmike
04-23-2009, 06:41 AM
You are OK with what you plan, except - Get that temp higher! Kick it to 300 minimum, 350 is OK.
No reason to cook any poultry "low n slow". Get the temp up and Git-R-Done!
Put your temp probe in the thickest part of the breast, not touching bone. Remember, it reads at the very tip so the tip has to be where you want to know the temp.
Go for it! It will turn out great. You'll see.

Joneser
04-23-2009, 06:47 AM
What he said ↑ If you cook it at the CG recommended temps, you'll have a rubbery skin. Remember that booklet also says if your smoke is white, it's just right....

Smokin_Turkey
04-23-2009, 06:59 AM
I always do turkey at 250 until nearing done and then quickly raise the temps to over 350. It would be easy to do in an egg or a UDS. I love the smoked slow roasted aspect of this way as opposed to just a wood oven style.

I would say you are right on with the breast temp. go for the thickest part in the middle and you will be fine. If there is a bone, you can get a little closer to the bone as I find the bones insulate the meat and cause lower temps.

Goodluck and post some pics!

Joneser
04-23-2009, 08:48 AM
If there is a bone, you can get a little closer to the bone as I find the bones insulate the meat and cause lower temps.

Goodluck and post some pics!
I'm not saying you are wrong, but the bone will heat up faster than the flesh/muscle and give you higher readings in that area. I'd stay away from the bone....I'd go that route if I were you, better safe than sorry. :twocents:

SmokyOkie
04-23-2009, 03:17 PM
I always do turkey at 250 until nearing done and then quickly raise the temps to over 350. It would be easy to do in an egg or a UDS. I love the smoked slow roasted aspect of this way as opposed to just a wood oven style.

I would say you are right on with the breast temp. go for the thickest part in the middle and you will be fine. If there is a bone, you can get a little closer to the bone as I find the bones insulate the meat and cause lower temps.

Goodluck and post some pics!

Most sources I have come across recommend a turkey be roasted @ 325. My experience tells me that that temp yields a more moist bird.

Time per # varies depending on the size of the bird or the breast. @ 325 I would figure on about 15 minutes per #, and check it at about 10 minutes/#.

use your thermapen and check it in several places at different distances from th bone and be sure that all parts are at 165 or above. rest for at least 20 minutes under foil before slicing.

lazy
04-23-2009, 09:12 PM
Cooked between 225 & 325 (couldn't get over 325). And I didn't babysit it like I did when I started doing this stuff. I just checked it every so often. On at 2, off about 5:30. Turned it 180 degrees once.

Took it off at 165 originally and couldn't hep myself--I had to cut a little slice off and try it before I foiled it. Super moist, but I didn't like the consistency. Felt too much like not-quite-done chicken. I went ahead and put it back on until it hit 170, then pulled it and tented it in foil until the potatoes were done. Good taste, not too salty. It was an "enhanced" breast

Got ready to slice it and I realized I have no idea how to carve it:oops:--the senior generation is still in charge of that at T-giving... So I just started at one side and worked my way across. It was still moist, but I shouldn't have put it back on after I pulled it the first time. Flavor was good. Even better was the aroma when I sliced the rest of it after supper. :wow: Even better than bacon frying in cast iron.

Before I put it on the grill, I rinsed it, dried it, and pulled the skin away and put plain old poultry seasoning up under the skin everywhere I could get to. Rubbed some EVOO on top of the skin after I pulled it back up.

How much are you folks paying for apple wood if you have to buy it? I think I paid way too much, but I wanted to try it, so... I paid $18.00 for 9 pounds of chunks, some w/bark. The lady couldn't tell me if it was priced by weight or by cubic foot, so I just weighed it when I got home.

Had some home-made potatoes hog-rotten to go with the turkey. Man, I hated those things when I was a kid. Thought it was the worst thing to do to a potato. I guess my taster is growing up...

Here's some pics:

http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b277/otisjr/char%20griller/P1020780.jpg

http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b277/otisjr/char%20griller/P1020782.jpg

http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b277/otisjr/char%20griller/P1020785.jpg

SmokyOkie
04-23-2009, 10:20 PM
Looks great. Nice color. You will get to learn to trust your thermo. When you pull it off at 165, it will hit 170-175 by the time it rests. It's called carryover.

As to paying too much for wood, was it worth the $18 bucks for what you got? My guess is that you'll get a few cooks out of it, so what the hey?