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SmokyOkie
03-12-2009, 10:29 AM
Does anybody know what makes a Vidalia onion a Vidalia onion, and are all Vidailia onions created equal?

I have some info on the subject of sweet onions if anyone is interested in a discussion.

Joneser
03-12-2009, 10:49 AM
I thought what made a Vidalia, a vidalia was the fact that it was grown in a certain county in Georgia....maybe Vidalia county. I'd have to research it more to be sure.
I know they are pretty sweet and some eat them like apples...not me.

SmokyOkie
03-12-2009, 10:54 AM
True, they do have to be grown in Vidalia county Georgia.

BYBBQ
03-12-2009, 12:07 PM
I know by law ( fed. and state ) to be called a Vidalia it has to be grown in Vidalia county. It is a hybred variety ( not sure which one ) of onion. They say the sweetness has something to do with the low sulfur content of the soil around there ( just what I've heard ). I also heard ( again not sure ) that the hybred variety was develpoed by the university down there.

Am I close???

SmokyOkie
03-12-2009, 12:11 PM
They can be one of several different varieties, but most are offshoots of the yellow granex.

peculiarmike
03-13-2009, 07:40 AM
SAY it! Just SAY it! Stop dragging it out! :ack2:
What ARE your thoughts?????
All replies so far have been correct.
Now let's hear yours.
What EXACTLY makes it a Vidalia? :shrug:








(You have waaayyyyyy too much free time) :roflmaoha0:

SmokyOkie
03-13-2009, 10:26 AM
By definition ( legally) a Vidalia onion is an onion that is grown in Vidalia county Georgia that is one of the following varieties: Sweet Vidalia, Granex 33, Savannah Sweet, Pegasus, Granex F1, Sweet Success, Dessex, Southern Belle, Southern Honey, Rio Bravo, Mr. Max and Adonis.

These are all offshoots of the yellow Granex ( or Grana) variety, which originated from the Bermuda onion

This list of varieties is amended each year to add new varieties that the powers that be deem acceptable.

They are basically the same thing as a Walla Walla sweet, or a Maui onion, but grown at that location.

The Texas 1015 is another similar variety that was developed for higher sugar content and disease resistance.

Fatback Joe
03-13-2009, 10:31 AM
Whew.......now I should be able to sleep at night. :sign0092:

Joneser
03-13-2009, 10:34 AM
By definition ( legally) a Vidalia onion is an onion that is grown in Vidalia county Georgia that is one of the following varieties: Sweet Vidalia, Granex 33, Savannah Sweet, Pegasus, Granex F1, Sweet Success, Dessex, Southern Belle, Southern Honey, Rio Bravo, Mr. Max and Adonis.

These are all offshoots of the yellow Granex ( or Grana) variety, which originated from the Bermuda onion

This list of varieties is amended each year to add new varieties that the powers that be deem acceptable.

They are basically the same thing as a Walla Walla sweet, or a Maui onion, but grown at that location.

The Texas 1015 is another similar variety that was developed for higher sugar content and disease resistance.

And what drew you to this topic? Are you planning on busting out a smoke you have up your sleeve? Thanks, I like that kind of obscure info.....

SmokyOkie
03-13-2009, 01:03 PM
Whew.......now I should be able to sleep at night. :sign0092:


Hey Joe, can you decode this BIOYASA

it may be NSFW


And what drew you to this topic? Are you planning on busting out a smoke you have up your sleeve? Thanks, I like that kind of obscure info.....

Just curious myself. I saw a thread about them and thought I might self educate.

I always knew that 1015s were higher sugar content, and now, I know it's not my imigination.:shrug:

As you gte to know me better, you'll see the most definite tendencies toward A.D.D.:blushing::msn-wink:

Joneser
03-13-2009, 01:20 PM
I was hoping for some SmokyOkie ADD smoked, stuffed Vidalias.
:D
Self education is such a wonderful thing....thank Al Gore for the interwebs!

Jake
03-13-2009, 02:18 PM
well son of a gun :shrug:

SmokyOkie
03-13-2009, 02:29 PM
I was hoping for some SmokyOkie ADD smoked, stuffed Vidalias.
:D
Self education is such a wonderful thing....thank Al Gore for the interwebs!

Y'know Brian, I do have a cople cippolini onions waiting to be caamelized. I think I'll do them tonight. I doubt I'll stuff them, but the ought to be good. I do need to revisit the stuffed smoked 1015s soon though.

:shrug:So many flavors, so little time.

Smokin Bill
03-13-2009, 04:16 PM
OK lets put this to practical use....:msn-wink: these are delicious.

Saturday Night Vidalia Onions
Recipe courtesy Paula Deen
Show: Paula's Home Cooking (http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/show_pa/0,1976,FOOD_10234,00.html) Episode: A Grilling BBQ (http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/show_pa/episode/0,1976,FOOD_10234_22696,00.html)

4 large Vidalia onions
3 beef bouillon cubes
4 tablespoons butter
Freshly ground black pepper
Prepare a fire in a charcoal grill or preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
Trim and slice from the top of each onion, and peel the onion without cutting off the root end. Using a potato peeler, cut a small cone shaped section from the center of the onion. Cut the onion into quarters from the top down, stopping within a 1/2-inch of the root end. Place a bouillon cube in the center of each onion, slip slivers of butter between the sections, and sprinkle with pepper. Wrap each onion in heavy duty foil and place the onions directly onto the hot coals. Cook the onions for 45 minutes turning every so often.
To serve, place each onion in individual bowl because the onions will produce a lot of broth, which tastes like French onion soup.

jminion
03-13-2009, 04:36 PM
Bill
You can step it a notch by putting some smoke on then before closing up the foil and placing them in hot coals. Try it you may enjoy the extra touch.

Smokin Bill
03-13-2009, 04:48 PM
I just cook them in the smoker with the top of the foil package open.

Smokin Bill
03-13-2009, 04:49 PM
Okie, one more post and it's the big 5,000; do it!!:msn-wink:

Florida Bill
03-13-2009, 05:56 PM
Tim,
You are very close to being accurate. However, Vidalia is not a county. It's a relatively small town in Toombs County. And that's the county in which the onions must be grown. It's the soil that gives them the wonderful taste. There are similar onions grown in Glynn county but they are clearly identified as such. I spent a lot of years in the Atlanta area and we used to look forward to May when the Vidalias come to town. Lots of organizations sell them in 25 and 50 lb. bags to raise money. They taste great but do not save well. It's best to eat them fairly quick. And by the way, the recipe above, perhaps even modified with Jim's suggestion is outstanding. Talk about something good with a steak mmmm good. But they are also great standalone.

Smokin Bill
03-13-2009, 06:11 PM
Tim,
You are very close to being accurate. However, Vidalia is not a county. It's a relatively small town in Toombs County. And that's the county in which the onions must be grown. It's the soil that gives them the wonderful taste. There are similar onions grown in Glynn county but they are clearly identified as such. I spent a lot of years in the Atlanta area and we used to look forward to May when the Vidalias come to town. Lots of organizations sell them in 25 and 50 lb. bags to raise money. They taste great but do not save well. It's best to eat them fairly quick. And by the way, the recipe above, perhaps even modified with Jim's suggestion is outstanding. Talk about something good with a steak mmmm good. But they are also great standalone.

Paula Dean is my hero, well anybody who cooks with as much butter is my hero actually. I leave the package open a the top in the smoker but the recipe is about the sweet onion, butter and beef broth. To add smoke to it would be like smoked French Onion Soup; which is what it tastes like with the strong element of sweet onion. Adding smoke (I'm assuming he meant liquid smoke) IMO would kind of kill the intended flavor of it all.

BYBBQ
03-13-2009, 07:35 PM
OK, this explains it........................................

A Vidalia onion is a sweet onion (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweet_onion) of certain varieties, grown in a production area defined by law in Georgia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georgia_%28U.S._state%29) and by the United States (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States) Code of Federal Regulations (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Code_of_Federal_Regulations) (CFR). The varieties include the hybrid (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hybrid_%28biology%29) yellow granex, varieties of granex parentage, or other similar varieties recommended by the Vidalia Onion Committee and approved by the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Secretary_of_Agriculture).
The onions were first grown near Vidalia, Georgia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vidalia,_Georgia), in the early 1930s. It is an unusually sweet variety of onion, due to the low amount of sulfur (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sulfur) in the soil in which the onions are grown. Mose Coleman is considered the person that discovered the sweet Vidalia Onion variety in 1931.
Georgia's state legislature passed the "Vidalia Onion Act of 1986" which authorized a trademark (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trademark) for "Vidalia Onions" and limits the production area to Georgia or any subset as defined by the state's Commissioner of Agriculture. The current definition includes:


The following thirteen counties: Emanuel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emanuel_County,_Georgia), Candler (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Candler_County,_Georgia), Treutlen (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treutlen_County,_Georgia), Bulloch (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulloch_County,_Georgia), Wheeler (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheeler_County,_Georgia), Montgomery (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montgomery_County,_Georgia), Evans (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulloch_County,_Georgia), Tattnall (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tattnall_County,_Georgia), Toombs (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toombs_County,_Georgia), Telfair (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telfair_County,_Georgia), Jeff Davis (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeff_Davis_County,_Georgia), Appling (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appling_County,_Georgia), and Bacon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacon_County,_Georgia).



Portions of the following seven counties: Jenkins (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jenkins_County,_Georgia), Screven (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screven_County,_Georgia), Laurens (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laurens_County,_Georgia), Dodge (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dodge_County,_Georgia), Pierce (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierce_County,_Georgia), Wayne (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wayne_County,_Georgia), and Long (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_County,_Georgia).

The Vidalia onion was named Georgia's official state vegetable (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lists_of_U.S._state_insignia) in 1990.

SmokyOkie
03-13-2009, 08:34 PM
I just knew this thread would go somewhere. Now it's getting some wheels!:thumbs up:

I stand corrected on the issue of county ( look close, I won't do that often:roflmaoha0::roflmaoha0::roflmaoha0:)

I must disagree, however with any statement that credits anybody with "discovering" the onion.

My research tells me also that how well they keep depends on the particular hybrid.

Personally, I prefer the improved yellow granex varieties. That would be the Texas 1015y. Whether from Texas or from South America, they seem to be more consistent, and generally have wider bands which to me seem to give a better crunch, but hey, that's just me. I'll use the vidalias when I can;t get 1015s. I guess that perhaps the fact the 1015y is only one hybrid, and the Vidalia is one of several would account for the inconsistancy.

BA_LoKo
03-13-2009, 09:00 PM
I just knew this thread would go somewhere. Now it's getting some wheels!:thumbs up:

I stand corrected on the issue of county ( look close, I won't do that often:roflmaoha0::roflmaoha0::roflmaoha0:)

I must disagree, however with any statement that credits anybody with "discovering" the onion.

My research tells me also that how well they keep depends on the particular hybrid.

Personally, I prefer the improved yellow granex varieties. That would be the Texas 1015y. Whether from Texas or from South America, they seem to be more consistent, and generally have wider bands which to me seem to give a better crunch, but hey, that's just me. I'll use the vidalias when I can;t get 1015s. I guess that perhaps the fact the 1015y is only one hybrid, and the Vidalia is one of several would account for the inconsistancy.

Tim, have you come up with any preferred way of storing either/any of these variaties of onions? I love buying them in bulk but even storing them in cool and dark places often leave me disappointed in how long they last.

SmokyOkie
03-13-2009, 10:03 PM
I buy them at the grocery store. they are available pretty much year round, sometimes coming from Chile. I look for the ones with no obvious sof spots or mold showing, and we very rarely have any go bad. Of course, they rarely stay in the onion bin longer than a week.

Oh, wait, let me back up. Did I say that I usually don't buy Vidalias? the fact that they only become available one time a year is part of the reason.

The Yellow granex is an easy is an easy onion to recognize. they have a yellow tint, but the skin isn;t as hard or as brown as a Spanish onion.

The improved yellow Granex 1015 is even easier. They are generally very large and very globular as opposed to being somewhat flat.

I went for about3 weeks this winter not being able to find them, then I went to Whole foods and they had some gargantuan big round ones that weighed about 2#.

As to storing, we never have them around more than a week or two.

Oh, but did I mention that the 1015 was developed especially for keeping longer and higher sugar content?

jminion
03-13-2009, 11:38 PM
We have the Walla Walla's up here, slightly different flavor (would assume soil has a lot to do with that). I've had Vidalias while in GA but not seen or tried the Tx onion.

BYBBQ
03-14-2009, 06:17 AM
Interesting...........

California Sweet 1015 onions are the same onion

Description/Taste
Deliciously sweet, succulent, mild and juicy, Texas 1015 SuperSweet onions will never make you cry. Low in pyruvate, the tear causing chemical present in onions and having a high in sugar and water content, these sweeties are the gourmet's onion delight. It's okay to thin skinned especially if you are an onion. Wrapped in a tissue thin golden skin, the creamy white interior offers a crisp, crunchy texture.

Nutritional Value
A nutritional bonus, one medium onion contains 60 calories, no fat, no cholesterol, 10 mg sodium, 14 g carbohydrates, 1 g protein, 20 mg vitamin C, 200 mg potassium and 2.8 g dietary fiber. Onions provide a generous amount of beneficial folic acid. Eating five daily servings of fruits and vegetables lowers the chances of cancer. A recent study found that eating nine or ten daily servings of fruits and vegetables, combined with three servings of low-fat dairy products, were effective in lowering blood pressure.

Applications
No reason to cry, Texas 1015 SuperSweet onions are eye-friendly and can be sliced and diced to add exceptional flavor to salads, sandwiches, hamburgers, casseroles, stews, salsas, dips, sauces, soups, stir-fries and vegetable medleys without any tears! Sautéing or roasting slowly caramelizes onions and enhances sweetness and taste. To make onions crispier and crunchier, place slices in ice water thirty minutes before serving. To store, keep onions cool and dry.

Geography/History
Developed in the early 1980's by Dr. Leonard Pike, a horticulture professor at Texas A&M University in Texas, Texas 1015 SuperSweet onions are actually named for their optimum planting date, October 15. Grown in the Rio Grande Valley in South Texas and taking ten years to produce, this onion has been dubbed the "million dollar baby" because of the enormous cost and amount of time it took to develop this exceptionally sweet onion. Mostly producing sweet yellow varieties, onions are Texas' leading vegetable crop. The sweet onion was adopted as Texas' official state onion in 1997.

SmokyOkie
03-14-2009, 06:40 PM
We have the Walla Walla's up here, slightly different flavor (would assume soil has a lot to do with that). I've had Vidalias while in GA but not seen or tried the Tx onion.

IMHO they are the onion to beat.


Interesting...........

California Sweet 1015 onions are the same onion

r 15. Grown in the Rio Grande Valley in South Texas and taking ten years to produce, this onion has been dubbed the "million dollar baby" because of the enormous cost and amount of time it took to develop this exceptionally sweet onion. Mostly producing sweet yellow varieties, onions are Texas' leading vegetable crop. The sweet onion was adopted as Texas' official state onion in 1997.

Taking 10 years to produce? Or would that be 10 years to develop?

I mean onions are annual plants.

Smokin66
03-15-2009, 08:17 AM
Not sure about where they come from or what onion family they belong to. I just no they are gooooooooood about any way you eat them.

Big GQ
03-15-2009, 10:36 AM
Bill
You can step it a notch by putting some smoke on then before closing up the foil and placing them in hot coals. Try it you may enjoy the extra touch.

We do it that way and it is so good. One of life's simple pleasures when they are in season.

Jake
03-17-2009, 09:19 PM
hmmm on another note check out this one i got today.... hmmmmmm



Riccardo's Beer-Battered Onion Rings


Preparation time: 20 minutes
Cooking time: 15 minutes
Yield: 4 servings



INGREDIENTS:


Onion Rings

* 1 large Spanish onion, sliced into 1-cm (1/2-inch) rounds and separated into rings (if desired, set aside the small centre rings for another use)
* 1/4 cup cornstarch



Batter

* 1 cup pastry flour
* 2 tbsp cornstarch
* 1/4 tsp baking powder
* 1/4 tsp salt
* 1 cup pale ale
* Oil for frying



DIRECTIONS:


Onion Rings

1. Preheat the deep fryer to 190°C (375°F). Place a cooling rack on a baking sheet or line a baking sheet with paper towels.
2. In a paper bag or large bowl, toss the onion rings in the cornstarch to coat well. Set aside.


Batter

1. In a bowl, combine the flour, cornstarch, baking powder and salt. Whisk in the beer.
2. Using your fingertips or a wooden chopstick, dip the rings in the batter, 4 or 5 at a time. Shake off excess batter and deep-fry for about 3 minutes, turning half way through cooking. Drain on the baking sheet. Season lightly with salt. Repeat with the remaining ingredients.

SmokyOkie
03-17-2009, 09:40 PM
You gonna do it and post pix?

Personally, I like about a 1 inch thick ring, and I like to do them double ringed.

Siesta Man
03-19-2009, 11:25 PM
We have a valley about 25 miles south of Deming NM and Just east of Columbus NM that raises the same kind of humongus, sweet, and full of juice onions ( 80% liquid ). They are called Gravallia onions. I think that is the original growers name but they are now owned by a family named Johnson.
We can't wait until May comes around so we can buy our supply. 50# bags. Break out the DO's, fill them with chopped onions and carmelize, deglaze and scrape bottom of pot until black but not burned. Add some red wine for the final deglaze, cool, and freeze til your ready for french onion soup. Be sure to process enough to last until next May. Will be making soup soon and will post with recipe. E.T.

SmokyOkie
03-20-2009, 11:06 AM
nike a cross between Granex and Vidalia. They are more than likely another improved yellow Granex.

I really like the idea of freezing onion soup concentrate. I can think of millions of uses for it.

Thanx for the idea, and I will be looking for the recipe.

Chargrilled
03-20-2009, 11:13 AM
If the Vidalia is the official state vegetable of Georgia then the freakin Soy Bean must be Indiana's!!!:roflmaoha0::roflmaoha0:

No seriously, official state vegetable???

Not the onion expert:shrug: but will try some of the methods mentioned in this thread, good post.

Jake
03-20-2009, 01:58 PM
You gonna do it and post pix?

Personally, I like about a 1 inch thick ring, and I like to do them double ringed.

will do, just need some time to do it :thumbs up:


We have a valley about 25 miles south of Deming NM and Just east of Columbus NM that raises the same kind of humongus, sweet, and full of juice onions ( 80% liquid ). They are called Gravallia onions. I think that is the original growers name but they are now owned by a family named Johnson.
We can't wait until May comes around so we can buy our supply. 50# bags. Break out the DO's, fill them with chopped onions and carmelize, deglaze and scrape bottom of pot until black but not burned. Add some red wine for the final deglaze, cool, and freeze til your ready for french onion soup. Be sure to process enough to last until next May. Will be making soup soon and will post with recipe. E.T.

great idea, cant wait to see the pics :thumbs up:

Abelman
03-20-2009, 03:59 PM
Like Smokin Bill said:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v73/abelman/Finished-2.jpg

They're great!

Siesta Man
03-20-2009, 05:34 PM
Hey Tim and all who requested this method of storing concentrated French onion soup or what ever you might want to use the onion base for. This recipe takes some time but for all of us that can always find time for low and slow cooks this is a snap. This has a lot of pics so here goes. These are from this past springs cook. We think that this is the best ever for us. Would enjoy your feedback. Can also be cooked on gas grill. Don't know if smokers will get hot enough. Thanks to Cooks Illustrated for the basic idea. I've made a few changes for our own tastes. Enjoy--- E.T.

INGREDIENTS and EQUIPMENT

1-Lrg.-----C I Dutch oven

1-Good wooden square ended spatula

3-pats----Butter

1-rounded tsp. Garlic salt.

6-lbs.-----lrg. sweet onions

1-C.------Red wine

2-ltrs.----Beef broth, Swanson or your choice, Home made is good

2-ltrs.----Chicken broth, Same as above

2-Cups.--Left over Brisket au-jus.

6-Sprigs--Fresh thyme

1-lrg.-----Bay leaf

RECIPE

Preheat oven to 400*

Put butter pats in bottom of pot. Clean and slice onions from pole to pole about 1/2 inch wide. Enough onions to fill pot completely. They will cook down. Sprinkle garlic salt over onions. Put lid on tight and into oven for 1 1/2 hrs. Remove lid and stir onions, especially any that might be sticking. Return lid but leave slightly ajar and back into oven for another 1 1/2 hrs.
Remove from oven and onto stove top burner. Remove lid and turn heat to med high. Cook down onions forming crustie goodies on the bottom being careful not to burn. You may have to adjust heat while cooking. Scrape the bottom of the pot with your spatula, gathering those brown goodies on the end of the spatula, add 1/2 cup hot water and scrape the goodies from spatula back into oinions, stir and repeat this 7 more times. The last time add the wine and clean the pot well with the spatula while there is still some liquid. When cooked down the last time begin adding the Beef broth, Chicken broth, and the Au-jus along with the Bay leaf, sprigs of thyme, tied, and pepper to taste.
Bring to boil and lower heat to simmer for 1 hr. Remove bay leaf and thyme
and you are ready to serve.

This recipe will make 24 cups or 12--2 cup bowls of soup with a dry toasted sliced garlic bread floater topped with Muenster and any medium Swiss sliced cheese. Under broiler until cheese is bubbily and serve.

To make the concentrated onions for freezing you only need to reduce the liquid items by 2/3rds. except the water and wine for deglazing. Cool well and into containers for freezing. I like Vac u seal type bags.

http://i448.photobucket.com/albums/qq203/Siesta_Man/Leftover%20au%20jus%20makes%20ambrosia/112208AsstPics017.jpg
http://i448.photobucket.com/albums/qq203/Siesta_Man/Leftover%20au%20jus%20makes%20ambrosia/112208AsstPics018.jpg
http://i448.photobucket.com/albums/qq203/Siesta_Man/Leftover%20au%20jus%20makes%20ambrosia/100_0493.jpg
http://i448.photobucket.com/albums/qq203/Siesta_Man/Leftover%20au%20jus%20makes%20ambrosia/100_0494.jpg
http://i448.photobucket.com/albums/qq203/Siesta_Man/Leftover%20au%20jus%20makes%20ambrosia/100_0495.jpg
http://i448.photobucket.com/albums/qq203/Siesta_Man/Leftover%20au%20jus%20makes%20ambrosia/100_0496.jpg
http://i448.photobucket.com/albums/qq203/Siesta_Man/Leftover%20au%20jus%20makes%20ambrosia/100_0497.jpg
http://i448.photobucket.com/albums/qq203/Siesta_Man/Leftover%20au%20jus%20makes%20ambrosia/100_0501.jpg
http://i448.photobucket.com/albums/qq203/Siesta_Man/Leftover%20au%20jus%20makes%20ambrosia/100_0502.jpg
http://i448.photobucket.com/albums/qq203/Siesta_Man/Leftover%20au%20jus%20makes%20ambrosia/100_0500.jpg
http://i448.photobucket.com/albums/qq203/Siesta_Man/Leftover%20au%20jus%20makes%20ambrosia/100_0501.jpg
http://i448.photobucket.com/albums/qq203/Siesta_Man/Leftover%20au%20jus%20makes%20ambrosia/100_0502.jpg
http://i448.photobucket.com/albums/qq203/Siesta_Man/Leftover%20au%20jus%20makes%20ambrosia/100_0503.jpg
http://i448.photobucket.com/albums/qq203/Siesta_Man/Leftover%20au%20jus%20makes%20ambrosia/100_0504.jpg
http://i448.photobucket.com/albums/qq203/Siesta_Man/Leftover%20au%20jus%20makes%20ambrosia/100_0505.jpg

Q-N-Brew
03-20-2009, 08:56 PM
You know there are some really nice recipes in this thread that should be in their own thread. We would hate for them to be lost because they can't be searched out.

Jake and Siesta Man can you help us out???

SmokyOkie
03-20-2009, 09:09 PM
Maybe you could prune them and place them in their own thread.

Q-N-Brew
03-20-2009, 09:12 PM
I can but thought I would give them the opportunity to do so first.

Don't you have some posts to delete somewhere??? :roflmaoha0:

SmokyOkie
03-20-2009, 09:16 PM
I can but thought I would give them the opportunity to do so first.

Don't you have some posts to delete somewhere??? :roflmaoha0:

I think you did it.