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View Full Version : 5 Chickens indirect on a Weber E320



Captain Cook
03-07-2009, 07:02 AM
So you guys like photos.
Well here is a photo of 5 large chickens Brined and Roasted on a Weber Genesis E320 using my indirect method.
I could have done 6 but I only needed 5


http://i731.photobucket.com/albums/ww311/aka_captain_cook/latestsep08033.jpg

Cheers

flying illini
03-07-2009, 07:54 AM
Nice.. wow, that is lot of chicken. Got a couple to do myself this afternoon.

TX Sandman
03-07-2009, 08:08 AM
So you guys like photos.

:thumbs up: Oh, yeah! No pics, didn't happen.

Well here is a photo of 5 large chickens Brined and Roasted on a Weber Genesis E320 using my indirect method.
I could have done 6 but I only needed 5

:wings: You win! Never seen that before. I'll have to remember that for future cooks.

What were the chix for? And where did you find the 2nd grates?

Joneser
03-07-2009, 12:26 PM
Nice looking birds! Thanks for the pix!

Jake
03-08-2009, 12:21 AM
maybe im missing something how is it indirect when all those birds fill the whole grill, is it cause of his other rack, indirect to me is when i cook it on the side with no flame under it :blushing:, someone fill me in on what i am missing please and thanks, maybe i had to many beer :shrug: and am missing it

TX Sandman
03-08-2009, 12:38 AM
In this case, it's indirect because the flames are shielded by the foil. The only thing cooking the chix is the hot air, not the direct flame.

Yeah, *technically* it isn't indirect cooking. But that's probably the closest term to describe it, IMO.

Jake
03-08-2009, 12:54 AM
not to dispute anything, but just as a question, say i wrapped pork chops in foil and did them on the grill, then would that be called indirect? i wouldnt say so, sorry i want to understand


on another note c/cook what temp were you at and how long? sorry my friend not trying to slam this at all i just want to understand, we all have different lingo and i want to get it :thumbs up:

TX Sandman
03-08-2009, 01:07 AM
not to dispute anything, but just as a question, say i wrapped pork chops in foil and did them on the grill, then would that be called indirect? i wouldnt say so, sorry i want to understand

If you wouldn't say so, then don't. Since they're wrapped, it'd be another method of cooking. I don't know exactly, but I bet someone does.

:twocents: Direct and indirect refer to the main source of cooking energy. Either the direct energy of the fire is cooking the food, or the fire is heating the air, which is dong the cooking. Note: this is how I look at it. I'm not working off the definitions here, but my own gray matter. I may be wrong.

Jake
03-08-2009, 01:20 AM
i don't think your wrong at all, i think it may be steamed (? well sort of is that the right word) if it is wrapped. but i cant figure out the indirect... just cause the foil is under it, you still have direct heat just not right on it, but does that count (guess thats what im getting at, i never realized indirect could be with flame under it, just separated from/by foil) guess thats what im asking can you call that indirect if your cooking on a "grill" but have foil between the food and the flame?? i have never heard that before, not that it matters a lick of differance but i want to understand the lingo? :shrug:

99nails
03-08-2009, 11:25 AM
Nice looking chicks Captain Cook.:drooling: Can you give the details? :kewlpics:

I'm the same as you Jake,the terms drive me nuts:ack2: Roasting is cooking with dry air, The foil I believe acts as the baffel between the flame and the bird, thus indirect/roasting. When a pork chop or other meat is wrapped, it is cooking in it's own juices, I believe it's called braise.

Then again, Pull the chickens out of there, put in a pan of bread dough and you are bakeing:shrug:

SmokyOkie
03-08-2009, 04:36 PM
I think that technically, if they are directly over the flames, they are not cooked indirect. I don't think we're being told the whole story though (he's keeping a secret) cuz I've never seen a gasser that could maintain temps to cook that evenly over the whole grill surface without being so hot that the bottom side would get burnt. A mere piece of foil wouldn't deflect that much heat, especially if it were placed that close to the meat.

What's the secret?

Captain Cook
03-08-2009, 07:51 PM
Nice looking chicks Captain Cook.:drooling: Can you give the details? :kewlpics:

I'm the same as you Jake,the terms drive me nuts:ack2: Roasting is cooking with dry air, The foil I believe acts as the baffel between the flame and the bird, thus indirect/roasting. When a pork chop or other meat is wrapped, it is cooking in it's own juices, I believe it's called braise.

Then again, Pull the chickens out of there, put in a pan of bread dough and you are bakeing:shrug:

Well Jake, et-all
I didn't think that a simple photo would cause so much discussion.
Theoretically it is a combination of Indirect and Convection Cooking. Needless to say it works and works very well. You are correct Jake, remove the chickens and place a pan of bread dough in and you can bake. I do this sometimes. Using this method I can cook just about anything.

If you use a Weber WSM then you are using a similar method as the water pan acts as the barrier between the fire and the meat. It sets up a convection airflow to which smoke is added. The temperature is controlled by adjusting the amount of oxygen intake through controlling the vents

My method is not new, it has been around in different forms for centuries. I, along with others, have just refined it for use on a BBQ.
The doubled over sheet of foil acts as a reflective barrier for the direct heat the double layer means that the small air-gap acts as a cooling barrier. The rack(s) are about 3/4" above the foil and the food sits on the rack. The hot air flows around the food evening out any hot temps from the foil surface and cooks the food using the convection technique similar to an oven. The juices from the meat drip onto the foil and boil off giving the wonderful BBQ flavour. The heat can be controlled by the use of 1, 2 or 3 burners being selected. As the cooking is done with the lid down the heat is relatively even. I tend to have the rear burner on low and the front on about medium but it will depend on the amount of food that you are cooking as the food absorbs the heat and therefore more food = more heat required.
There are variations to this technique one of my favourite is to cook beef indirectly with just 1 burner on low for a few hours with a little smoke (place a chunk over the interconnect burner and next to the burner that is on) and then rest for 10 - 15 minutes while I crank the BBQ up to max heat with all burners going and then sear the beef for about a minute a side - This method is called the reverse sear.

One of the things that I love about cooking on a BBQ is you are only limited by your imagination.
In your terms - I BBQ, Grill, Smoke, Roast, Bake, Stew, Stirfry Casserole on my BBQs. Some I do in the Weber Performer or Kettles, some I do in the Weber Genesis E320 gasser and some I do in my Weber Q 220.

I trust that this gives you an understanding of how it works and what else you can do with your BBQs.

Cheers

Jake
03-08-2009, 08:32 PM
Nice looking chicks Captain Cook.:drooling: Can you give the details? :kewlpics:

I'm the same as you Jake,the terms drive me nuts:ack2: Roasting is cooking with dry air, The foil I believe acts as the baffel between the flame and the bird, thus indirect/roasting. When a pork chop or other meat is wrapped, it is cooking in it's own juices, I believe it's called braise.

Then again, Pull the chickens out of there, put in a pan of bread dough and you are bakeing:shrug:

thanks i didnt think i was going to be the only one confused some


Well Jake, et-all
I didn't think that a simple photo would cause so much discussion.
Theoretically it is a combination of Indirect and Convection Cooking. Needless to say it works and works very well. You are correct Jake, remove the chickens and place a pan of bread dough in and you can bake. I do this sometimes. Using this method I can cook just about anything.

If you use a Weber WSM then you are using a similar method as the water pan acts as the barrier between the fire and the meat. It sets up a convection airflow to which smoke is added. The temperature is controlled by adjusting the amount of oxygen intake through controlling the vents

My method is not new, it has been around in different forms for centuries. I, along with others, have just refined it for use on a BBQ.
The doubled over sheet of foil acts as a reflective barrier for the direct heat the double layer means that the small air-gap acts as a cooling barrier. The rack(s) are about 3/4" above the foil and the food sits on the rack. The hot air flows around the food evening out any hot temps from the foil surface and cooks the food using the convection technique similar to an oven. The juices from the meat drip onto the foil and boil off giving the wonderful BBQ flavour. The heat can be controlled by the use of 1, 2 or 3 burners being selected. As the cooking is done with the lid down the heat is relatively even. I tend to have the rear burner on low and the front on about medium but it will depend on the amount of food that you are cooking as the food absorbs the heat and therefore more food = more heat required.
There are variations to this technique one of my favourite is to cook beef indirectly with just 1 burner on low for a few hours with a little smoke (place a chunk over the interconnect burner and next to the burner that is on) and then rest for 10 - 15 minutes while I crank the BBQ up to max heat with all burners going and then sear the beef for about a minute a side - This method is called the reverse sear.

One of the things that I love about cooking on a BBQ is you are only limited by your imagination.
In your terms - I BBQ, Grill, Smoke, Roast, Bake, Stew, Stirfry Casserole on my BBQs. Some I do in the Weber Performer or Kettles, some I do in the Weber Genesis E320 gasser and some I do in my Weber Q 220.

I trust that this gives you an understanding of how it works and what else you can do with your BBQs.

Cheers

thanks for elaborating :thumbs up: and sorry i thing i forgot to say :kewlpics:
cant wait to see more form you :thumbs up:

SmokyOkie
03-08-2009, 09:40 PM
:whathesaid: