PDA

View Full Version : Squirrel ideas



Chargrilled
12-04-2008, 12:32 PM
With any luck picking up the gun on Fri. (Bass Pro) Sighting in the scope on Fri. evening.

Doin alil research on my huntin spot Sat.

Sun. daylight till noon or until I bag 5 of the tree varmints.

I was thinkin, after cleanin, rub em, bacon wrapped on a spit, onto the CG until bacon done or around 150 or so.

Any ideas, I will check in later.

I am going to save few for fried squirrel with biscuits and gravy:msn-wink:

flying illini
12-04-2008, 12:42 PM
Did you go to that new one on I-80/94? It was not open yet when I finished my frequent travels over there in 2007.

SmokyOkie
12-04-2008, 09:59 PM
With any luck picking up the gun on Fri. (Bass Pro) Sighting in the scope on Fri. evening.

Doin alil research on my huntin spot Sat.

Sun. daylight till noon or until I bag 5 of the tree varmints.

I was thinkin, after cleanin, rub em, bacon wrapped on a spit, onto the CG until bacon done or around 150 or so.

Any ideas, I will check in later.

I am going to save few for fried squirrel with biscuits and gravy:msn-wink:

Slow and moist is my rule for tree rats.

peculiarmike
12-05-2008, 06:51 PM
DON'T eat the brains. They do bad things to you. Fact.

Jake
12-05-2008, 07:53 PM
i know this is gonna sound crazy but....... you eat Squirrel ? also what would eating the brain do... why the heck would you eat it anyway :roflmaoha0::roflmaoha0: i dont know about you guys but my local store has a chit load of options and the dont include Squirrel? let me guess it tastes like chicken??:ack2:

californiasmokin
12-05-2008, 08:25 PM
You could look at some of these,maybe one will appeal to you.

http://www.backwoodsbound.com/zsquir.html

http://www.mikewest.net/squirrel/recipes.html

http://www.jerrysbaitandtackle.com/

californiasmokin
12-05-2008, 08:33 PM
i know this is gonna sound crazy but....... you eat Squirrel ? also what would eating the brain do... why the heck would you eat it anyway :roflmaoha0::roflmaoha0: i dont know about you guys but my local store has a chit load of options and the dont include Squirrel? let me guess it tastes like chicken??:ack2:

You don't eat fish.We would hardly expect you to try squirrel.But I bet if you got lost in the woods and that was all the meat you could catch that you wouldn't be so quick to turn your nose up at it!

You better watch what you say.Sounds like you are going to take a trip out to visit with these folks at the get together.Never know what new delicacy they might serve you after you've had a couple of beers:roflmaoha0::roflmaoha0:

BA_LoKo
12-05-2008, 08:40 PM
You don't eat fish.We would hardly expect you to try squirrel.But I bet if you got lost in the woods and that was all the meat you could catch that you wouldn't be so quick to turn your nose up at it!

You better watch what you say.Sounds like you are going to take a trip out to visit with these folks at the get together.Never know what new delicacy they might serve you after you've had a couple of beers:roflmaoha0::roflmaoha0:

Shhh, Paul! We weren't going to tell him what we put in the beer either! :msn-wink: :roflmaoha0::roflmaoha0::roflmaoha0:

californiasmokin
12-05-2008, 08:52 PM
Here you go Jake .Look for this in your nearest meat counter.

http://www.woodybobs.com/squirrelrecipes.html

SmokyOkie
12-05-2008, 11:13 PM
DON'T eat the brains. They do bad things to you. Fact.

What does eating the brains do to you?


i know this is gonna sound crazy but....... you eat Squirrel ? also what would eating the brain do... why the heck would you eat it anyway :roflmaoha0::roflmaoha0: i dont know about you guys but my local store has a chit load of options and the dont include Squirrel? let me guess it tastes like chicken??:ack2:

Tastes better than chicken ever hoped to. Tastes like rat!

Seriously Jake, squirrel is a delicacy. If anyone could ever figure a way to deliver it to market at a cost similar to chicken, chicken would be history.

ds7662
12-06-2008, 12:35 AM
I generally pressure cook them, cause the meat is so darn tuff. Them pull the meat from the bones and throw it in a good pot of stew.

peculiarmike
12-06-2008, 11:55 AM
Doctors probe squirrel-eaters

Thursday August 28 Reuter LONDON - U.S. doctors are studying a possible link between eating squirrel brains and catching the human variant of mad cow disease. Dr. Joseph Berger, a neurologist at the University of Kentucky, said in a letter to the Lancet medical journal that more research was needed but cautioned against eating squirrels or similar rodents.

Berger said he had been conducting research into the fatal Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) when he noticed that one patient, a Kentucky native, had a history of eating squirrel brains. Consuming small rodents is not uncommon in the southern state where squirrel brains are either scrambled with eggs or used in a stew called "burgoo."
Berger and his colleagues studied the eating habits of five patients in a western Kentucky clinic with probable or definite CJD and found that all had a history of eating squirrel brains. A new strain of CJD has been linked with eating beef from cows infected with Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), or mad cow disease in Britain, and several case reports suggest that CJD can be transmitted by consuming the brains of wild animals.
Berger noted that patients with other diseases also had a fondness for the rodent.
"Eating squirrel brains was reported in 12 of 42 patients with Parkinson's disease seen in the same clinic and 27 or 100 age-matched controls without neurological disease living in western Kentucky," he told the Lancet.
http://www.mad-cow.org/~tom/colorbar_anim.gif
I eat squirrel, no problem. It's the brains you want to stay clear of. Just in case they might transmit CJD. And it will kill you. This is still under study. Why take a chance?
Mike

Jake
12-06-2008, 12:22 PM
You don't eat fish.We would hardly expect you to try squirrel.But I bet if you got lost in the woods and that was all the meat you could catch that you wouldn't be so quick to turn your nose up at it!
doubt it, theres still bark, berries my arm, poop or another arm :roflmaoha0:

You better watch what you say.Sounds like you are going to take a trip out to visit with these folks at the get together.Never know what new delicacy they might serve you after you've had a couple of beers:roflmaoha0::roflmaoha0:
ill take my chances


Here you go Jake .Look for this in your nearest meat counter.

http://www.woodybobs.com/squirrelrecipes.html

any cook book you can buy for 1.95 must be the first sign, how ever the recipe with beer sounded good :msn-wink:


Tastes better than chicken ever hoped to. Tastes like rat!
thought so, oh sorry i thought you said butt:msn-wink: :roflmaoha0:

Seriously Jake, squirrel is a delicacy. If anyone could ever figure a way to deliver it to market at a cost similar to chicken, chicken would be history.[/quote]
really no kidding, then why did someone else say its tuff?? might of tried it until i kept on reading.

[quote=peculiarmike;21951]Doctors probe squirrel-eaters

Thursday August 28 Reuter LONDON - U.S. doctors are studying a possible link between eating squirrel brains and catching the human variant of mad cow disease. Dr. Joseph Berger, a neurologist at the University of Kentucky, said in a letter to the Lancet medical journal that more research was needed but cautioned against eating squirrels or similar rodents.

Berger said he had been conducting research into the fatal Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) when he noticed that one patient, a Kentucky native, had a history of eating squirrel brains. Consuming small rodents is not uncommon in the southern state where squirrel brains are either scrambled with eggs or used in a stew called "burgoo."
Berger and his colleagues studied the eating habits of five patients in a western Kentucky clinic with probable or definite CJD and found that all had a history of eating squirrel brains. A new strain of CJD has been linked with eating beef from cows infected with Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), or mad cow disease in Britain, and several case reports suggest that CJD can be transmitted by consuming the brains of wild animals.
Berger noted that patients with other diseases also had a fondness for the rodent.

"Eating squirrel brains was reported in 12 of 42 patients with Parkinson's disease seen in the same clinic and 27 or 100 age-matched controls without neurological disease living in western Kentucky," he told the Lancet.

http://www.mad-cow.org/~tom/colorbar_anim.gif
I eat squirrel, no problem. It's the brains you want to stay clear of. Just in case they might transmit CJD. And it will kill you. This is still under study. Why take a chance?




Mike

thats what im saying only for the hole thing :ack2:
i gotta ask when was the last time you had it? chit that could be fun though, picture it, i could be sitting in the yard beer in one hand, crap pellet gun in the other.... BANG...., then i could send the cat to go bring it back, chit i could have 4 or five in no time at all, you think a flying squirrel would taste different than chip or dale.:shrug: :msn-wink::roflmaoha0:

drtibird
12-06-2008, 01:34 PM
My favorite is squirrel & dumplings. Season to taste (salt/pepper/garlic) and boil
until tender then add a can of cheap canned biscuits (quartered) for the dumplings. Got that recipe from an old camp cook; the canned biscuits save a lot of time and trouble.

I don't eat squirrel brains or any other kind. My dad used to make pork brains and eggs but I just refused to eat them.

chef schwantz
12-06-2008, 02:27 PM
I'll eat tree rat, but it is an awful lot of work for what amounts to the meat from a couple of chicken wings. You really need to find a way to keep it moist while cooking, otherwise it makes jerky look tender. And I guess I've never been real big on eating parts that would be featured on Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmeren, so I'll pass on the hillbilly delicacies.:twocents::twocents:

Jake
12-06-2008, 04:02 PM
:msn-wink:
I'll eat tree rat, but it is an awful lot of work for what amounts to the meat from a couple of chicken wings. You really need to find a way to keep it moist while cooking, otherwise it makes jerky look tender. And I guess I've never been real big on eating parts that would be featured on Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmeren, so I'll pass on the hillbilly delicacies.:twocents::twocents:

well you sort of did, this still blows me away, i will still try it, but god knows im not sure!!! :shrug: i would like to to give a but im scared :msn-wink::roflmaoha0:
night time for me to go night night..... see pip i do know when to say no:thumbs up:

SmokyOkie
12-06-2008, 08:43 PM
I'll eat tree rat, but it is an awful lot of work for what amounts to the meat from a couple of chicken wings. You really need to find a way to keep it moist while cooking, otherwise it makes jerky look tender. And I guess I've never been real big on eating parts that would be featured on Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmeren, so I'll pass on the hillbilly delicacies.:twocents::twocents:

Actually squirrel is considered a delicacy in many other parts of the world. In fact, right now there is a shortage of commercially available squirrel in Great Britain.

Squirrel is not hard to keep moist. It favors being braised and is very tender and succulent when done properly. There is a lot more meat on a squirrel than there is on a "couple chicken wings". Two squirrels along with a couple sides is a fair meal.

If you haven't tried it, you shouldn;t condemn it as being a "hillbilly delicacy", and if you've only had it hard and dry, you should find out how to cook it before you relegate it to such descriptors.

I suppose you also think that crawfish is of a similar culinary genre?

chef schwantz
12-06-2008, 09:10 PM
To clarify, I wasn't refering to the squirrel meat itself as a "hillbilly delicacy", only the brains. I've eaten many tree rats, made all different ways. The only ways I've found it tender are with moist heat(braised or stewed) or poached in grease(confit). That was my point in saying if you don't prepare it right it can get tougher than jerkey. Sorry if i didn't make myself clear enough.

And I've sucked and shucked my way through many a mudbug boil.

SmokyOkie
12-06-2008, 09:27 PM
:oops: Sorry, I prolly just missed it. Long day.

Chargrilled
12-09-2008, 11:57 AM
Did you go to that new one on I-80/94? It was not open yet when I finished my frequent travels over there in 2007.
Yes Glen, awesome Bass Pro, one of the largest footprints they make! But they also built and opened a Cabelas!!!! I love that store also. Dam am I spoiled!


You could look at some of these,maybe one will appeal to you.

http://www.backwoodsbound.com/zsquir.html

http://www.mikewest.net/squirrel/recipes.html

http://www.jerrysbaitandtackle.com/
Thanks for the links they will help:thumbs up:


I generally pressure cook them, cause the meat is so darn tuff. Them pull the meat from the bones and throw it in a good pot of stew.
Never thought about pressure cooking them. For sure want to stay away from "tuff" that is the reason I wrote the thread, get sommin outta the experiences of others:D


My favorite is squirrel & dumplings. Season to taste (salt/pepper/garlic) and boil
until tender then add a can of cheap canned biscuits (quartered) for the dumplings. Got that recipe from an old camp cook; the canned biscuits save a lot of time and trouble.

I don't eat squirrel brains or any other kind. My dad used to make pork brains and eggs but I just refused to eat them.
that sounds fantastic also! ummmmmm may have to give that one a shot.

Update to the thread, I finally got out, after work had destoryed 3 friggin weekends for me! I sighted the .22 in with subsonic rounds and when we went huntin I loaded the rifle with CB bullets:tap: they shoot like an inch low at 40yards. So for my first squirrel huntin trip I had a blast! There was a couple acres of woods that I was in. A buddy of mine was bout 75yrds away from the woods in a small set up of timbers, like 6trees and brush. He was hoping I would chase some deer but no go. I saw like 6-7 tree varmit, scoped 3 of them and took a shot at one but bullet droped and it hit the branch below him. I was cussin as soon as I shot cus I knew I had loaded the CB rounds:shrug:. Lookin to get out later this week.

FYI, there are some great videos on cleaning them rascles on youtube, check it out. I think it will be a breeze!

I have heard of fried squirrel but I was lookin to somke on the drum, esp if I need a moist heat. Maybe rub and wrap in bacon???

Thanks for all the replies.

Jake
12-09-2008, 01:13 PM
im so intrested in this and im not even sure why. if pip comes home from work and i say squirrel you may never hear from me again, let alone the kids would be like living with green peace (sorry to anyone i offend with that one)
might have to try it on the down low :msn-wink: anyone know of a resturant that serves squirrel ?? :shrug:

SmokyOkie
12-09-2008, 04:04 PM
Yes Glen, awesome Bass Pro, one of the largest footprints they make! But they also built and opened a Cabelas!!!! I love that store also. Dam am I spoiled!

Have you noticed that Bass Pro seems to be turning into the "Walmart" of outdoor stores?

Never thought about pressure cooking them. For sure want to stay away from "tuff" that is the reason I wrote the thread, get sommin outta the experiences of others:D

I never pressure cooked 'e. Just a good long simmer in the gravy.


that sounds fantastic also! ummmmmm may have to give that one a shot.

Update to the thread, I finally got out, after work had destoryed 3 friggin weekends for me! I sighted the .22 in with subsonic rounds and when we went huntin I loaded the rifle with CB bullets:tap: they shoot like an inch low at 40yards. I was cussin as soon as I shot cus I knew I had loaded the CB rounds:shrug:. Lookin to get out later this week.

I like CB longs. They're a litle quieter and have a little more thump when they hit. For those unfamiliar, a CB is an ultra low velocity rimfire shell. They are known for being quiet. They generally make less noise being shot than they make when they hit the target. Quieter in fact than most air rifles. This is valuable when hunting squirrels, cuz it doesn't chase the other squirrels away. In fact, sometimes it causes them to come peek out of their holes to see what the noise was.

Trav, sight your rifle in with the CBs and it won't shoot low.

FYI, there are some great videos on cleaning them rascles on youtube, check it out. I think it will be a breeze!

I have heard of fried squirrel but I was lookin to somke on the drum, esp if I need a moist heat. Maybe rub and wrap in bacon???

Thanks for all the replies.

It really need to be cooked in liquid Trav. Think about dredging it in flour and browning it off in a skillet, then make a little gravy and bury it in sliced onions. Put that whole thing in the smoker and smoke/bake it at 250 for about on hour or until tender


im so intrested in this and im not even sure why. if pip comes home from work and i say squirrel you may never hear from me again, let alone the kids would be like living with green peace (sorry to anyone i offend with that one)
might have to try it on the down low :msn-wink: anyone know of a resturant that serves squirrel ?? :shrug:


There's one in Bugtussle Jake.

Jake
12-09-2008, 11:17 PM
It really need to be cooked in liquid Trav. Think about dredging it in flour and browning it off in a skillet, then make a little gravy and bury it in sliced onions. Put that whole thing in the smoker and smoke/bake it at 250 for about on hour or until tender




There's one in Bugtussle Jake.

where the heck is that? is that really a name of a place? bet the mayors a cockroach and wrestles friday nights at the local gym :roflmaoha0::roflmaoha0: oh chit hope no one is the mayor now that i said that :msn-wink: :roflmaoha0:

Chargrilled
12-10-2008, 08:40 AM
It really need to be cooked in liquid Trav. Think about dredging it in flour and browning it off in a skillet, then make a little gravy and bury it in sliced onions. Put that whole thing in the smoker and smoke/bake it at 250 for about on hour or until tender


hear the trick is to not over cook, be hard to get a therm in the lil sucker so I guess I will cook for 40-50 min and try to pull the meat from the bone checking for how easily the fork goes in.

On the pit I guess this will be foiled, correct?? Brown gravy made from the tidbits in the pan after browning them?? some onions, carrots, shrooms.

Maybe trying this on Sun. as we are going out tomorrow morning for a hunt then have to go to a thousand xmas parties starting tonite thru sat.:ack2:

SmokyOkie
12-10-2008, 01:10 PM
where the heck is that? is that really a name of a place? bet the mayors a cockroach and wrestles friday nights at the local gym :roflmaoha0::roflmaoha0: oh chit hope no one is the mayor now that i said that :msn-wink: :roflmaoha0:

Ask Teaser, he knows.


hear the trick is to not over cook, be hard to get a therm in the lil sucker so I guess I will cook for 40-50 min and try to pull the meat from the bone checking for how easily the fork goes in.

On the pit I guess this will be foiled, correct?? Brown gravy made from the tidbits in the pan after browning them?? some onions, carrots, shrooms.

Maybe trying this on Sun. as we are going out tomorrow morning for a hunt then have to go to a thousand xmas parties starting tonite thru sat.:ack2:


Actually, the trick is to overcook them. they have to simmer until they are pretty much fall off the bone tender. You don't have the patience to overcook them to the point where they're ruined.

Teaser
12-10-2008, 03:11 PM
There's one in Bugtussle Jake.

Otherwise known as Flowering Mound. Cow patties sure can be pretty in the spring. :msn-wink:

SmokyOkie
12-10-2008, 04:05 PM
No, not that one, this one

file:///C:/DOCUME%7E1/COMPAQ%7E1/LOCALS%7E1/Temp/moz-screenshot-20.jpgfile:///C:/DOCUME%7E1/COMPAQ%7E1/LOCALS%7E1/Temp/moz-screenshot-21.jpg
http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p190/dickeydoobbq/bugtussle/FireShotcapture18-MapofBugTussleOKb.png

Gunslinger
12-11-2008, 02:30 PM
I'd like to weigh in on this since tree rats have been a major part of the winter cuisine in my house for many years.

Our favorite ways to cook them is to simmer in a slow cooker all day in our favorite BBQ sauce and a can of beer. Or rolled in flour loaded with 99X, and pressure fried, same as we do gizzards.

Years ago I hunted with a guy from Northern Missouri and he actually would suck the raw brains from their heads. Now that's just nasty. I kept hunting with him, but I gave up eating with him.

And for the record, I live in the heart of "hillbilly" country. I have yet to find one that will eat squirrel brains. The guy I hunted with is from Northern Missouri, about 5 miles south of Iowa. Might as well be Canada, if you ask me.

Jake
12-11-2008, 03:18 PM
Years ago I hunted with a guy from Northern Missouri and he actually would suck the raw brains from their heads. Now that's just nasty. I kept hunting with him, but I gave up eating with him.
:puke

And for the record, I live in the heart of "hillbilly" country. I have yet to find one that will eat squirrel brains. The guy I hunted with is from Northern Missouri, about 5 miles south of Iowa. Might as well be Canada, if you ask me.[/quote]
:smack: just what are you getting at :msn-wink:

SmokyOkie
12-11-2008, 04:49 PM
Or rolled in flour loaded with 99X, and pressure fried, same as we do gizzards.


What is 99X, and what is "pressure frying"?

Gunslinger
12-11-2008, 09:36 PM
What is 99X, and what is "pressure frying"?
Tim, I know you're pulling my chain, but for those that may not know, I'll explain.
99X is the closest anyone has come to the original 11 spices and herbs in the correct ratio that the Colonel mixed it (pre 1964 when he sold the company). His name was Bill Summers, owner of Marion Kay Spice Company. Bill Summers dubbed it 99X meaning 99% Sanders and 1% Summers.
There is a lot of history behind the original recipe as you all know. Supposedly, when the Colonel sold the business, the recipe was put into a safe deposit box never to be seen again. After the company was sold the new owners apparently changed the recipe and this made the Colonel mad, so he went to Summers and asked him to reverse engineer the recipe from a bag of the original that the Colonel had left on his desk. After the task was completed, the Colonel reportedly gave the recipe thumbs-up, and stated "this is the was it USED to taste."
Never-the-less, the mix is only available from Marion Kay, and it's supposed to taste like it did in the beginning before Sanders sold. If it's true, I can see why the chicken was such a success.

Pressure frying is just that. Basically pressure cooking, but with oil instead of water. It is the way Colonel Sanders fried his chicken when he got to busy to use the cast iron skillet he first used. You can cook crispy, moist, tender chicken in less that 20 minutes and it's still done the same way. It's the only way to do gizzards in my book. They are super tender when pressure fried.
I must warn anyone wanting to try this. A stove top pressure fryer may look like an average pressure cooker, but it is not. A pressure cooker is not intended to fry or use oil.
The only place I've seen home pressure fryers lately is on Ebay. I got mine from my Mom years ago.

Chargrilled
12-12-2008, 08:53 AM
Tim, I know you're pulling my chain, but for those that may not know, I'll explain.
99X is the closest anyone has come to the original 11 spices and herbs in the correct ratio that the Colonel mixed it (pre 1964 when he sold the company). His name was Bill Summers, owner of Marion Kay Spice Company. Bill Summers dubbed it 99X meaning 99% Sanders and 1% Summers.
There is a lot of history behind the original recipe as you all know. Supposedly, when the Colonel sold the business, the recipe was put into a safe deposit box never to be seen again. After the company was sold the new owners apparently changed the recipe and this made the Colonel mad, so he went to Summers and asked him to reverse engineer the recipe from a bag of the original that the Colonel had left on his desk. After the task was completed, the Colonel reportedly gave the recipe thumbs-up, and stated "this is the was it USED to taste."
Never-the-less, the mix is only available from Marion Kay, and it's supposed to taste like it did in the beginning before Sanders sold. If it's true, I can see why the chicken was such a success.

Pressure frying is just that. Basically pressure cooking, but with oil instead of water. It is the way Colonel Sanders fried his chicken when he got to busy to use the cast iron skillet he first used. You can cook crispy, moist, tender chicken in less that 20 minutes and it's still done the same way. It's the only way to do gizzards in my book. They are super tender when pressure fried.
I must warn anyone wanting to try this. A stove top pressure fryer may look like an average pressure cooker, but it is not. A pressure cooker is not intended to fry or use oil.
The only place I've seen home pressure fryers lately is on Ebay. I got mine from my Mom years ago.

Thanks for the info slinger. I am now lookin for 2 cooking methods as I landed 7 of the buggers yesterday:cheer::woohoo::woohoo:

First real hunt, think the scope is sighted correctly now:msn-wink:.

I got 2 huge fox squirrels and 5 lil pineys. I quartered the foxers and left the pineys whole for frying. I bagged them separately. My idea is to fry the pineys and stew the fox in a crockpot with a concoction of some sort.

Pressure frying, learn summin new everyday, I like it.

99X I had heard of while back but couldnt remember so thanks for the info.

SmokyOkie
12-12-2008, 01:45 PM
I had read several places that the secret herbs and spices matched identically to Good Seasons Italian dressing mix, but I never tried it.

I've never seen a stove top pressure fryer before Gunny. Now ya went and did it though. Just one more new piece of cooking equipment to buy.:roflmaoha0:

We always did livers and gizzards together in cast iron. We call 'em chicken lizzards, and they're never tough unless you over cook them. I bet they'd really be tender if pressure fried.

Gunslinger
12-13-2008, 09:40 AM
I had read several places that the secret herbs and spices matched identically to Good Seasons Italian dressing mix, but I never tried it.
I had also heard this years ago. But I believe it's been debunked. Or maybe it's closer to the "original recipe" of today, which, if many of you old timers that ate KFC pre 1964 remember, is different from the real original recipe both in ingredients and flavor. Also, and I know it's trivial, but originally the Colonel called it "11 secret SPICES and herbs," which puts more emphasis on spices than herbs.


I've never seen a stove top pressure fryer before Gunny. Now ya went and did it though. Just one more new piece of cooking equipment to buy.:roflmaoha0:
To my knowledge, there were only 2 ever made and they are out of production now. The Wear Ever "Chicken Bucket" in both 4 and 6 qt. and the Presto "Chick N Fryer," are available on ebay.


We always did livers and gizzards together in cast iron. We call 'em chicken lizzards, and they're never tough unless you over cook them. I bet they'd really be tender if pressure fried.
I always did it in cast iron too, until I came across the pressure fryer that my Mom had.
The only problem with skillet frying is that the gizzards are still chewy and the tendon in tough if you don't remove it first, which when you do a lot of gizzards is a lot of extra work. When pressure fried, they melt in your mouth.
Way back when, my hunting buddies and I would save the gizzards, hearts and livers from our pheasant, and get together as a group and have a huge "gut fry" in the spring. Pheasant guts, Friends and beer.......The good ole' days.

Here's a little known fact for some of you. Did you know that birds are not the only animal with a gizzard? Many animals and fish have gizzards. This is where the gizzard shad gets it's name from. Even crocodiles have a gizzard.

Didn't mean to hijack this thread, so I'll get back on topic.
When frying very lean meat such as rabbit and squirrel, pressure frying will make it melt in your mouth tender, very moist and never greasy.

PigCicles
12-13-2008, 11:28 AM
Excellent suggestions Gunny. I've never tried the 99x, but I think I'm going to look it up.

Gunslinger
12-13-2008, 11:59 AM
Excellent suggestions Gunny. I've never tried the 99x, but I think I'm going to look it up.
The 99X is only available at http://www.marionkay.com/Merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=MKS&Product_Code=S609&Category_Code=Blends
It has to blended with 3 lbs of flake salt and 25 lbs of flour. Of coarse you can cut this down, but that's what a full jar of 99X will season.

Jake
12-13-2008, 01:33 PM
The 99X is only available at http://www.marionkay.com/Merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=MKS&Product_Code=S609&Category_Code=Blends
It has to blended with 3 lbs of flake salt and 25 lbs of flour. Of coarse you can cut this down, but that's what a full jar of 99X will season.

how long would it keep if we portioned it, i would have to eat a chit load of chicken to go through all that??? must be able to store it air tight for a long time under the right conditions :shrug:
so having said this...say i buy all the above mix and then separate into usable sizes, whats the shelf life on it you figure?? :blushing:

Gunslinger
12-13-2008, 01:40 PM
Shelf life is that of any other seasoning mix. Just keep a lid on it and put it in the spice cabinet, it will keep for years. I buy probably one every year.
It comes in a 30 oz. container, so it converts to 1.92 oz. of fine flake salt and 1.2 oz. of 99X to every lb of flour. This is by weight, not volume. I don't have to volumetric conversion, because if I can, I weigh all my ingredients. It's more accurate than volume, especially when baking.
Any of you that make bread, can really benefit if you measure your ingredients by weight instead of volume. There are way to many variables when measuring in volume that can make the whole thing go wrong. There's only one variable in measuring by weight, and that's accuracy of the scale.
None of you know this because I have never let you in on it, but my favorite part of the cooking hobby is baking and cake decorating. I don't tell this to just anyone, because it's kinda ***. But I do a lot of baking, especially breads and cakes. The quality of my baked goods has gone up 1000% since I starting measuring by weight.
I decorate cakes on the side, for friends, family and folks in my church congregation. And I'm pretty darn good at it.
There I go, hijacking this thread again. Sorry guys.

Jake
12-13-2008, 02:10 PM
Shelf life is that of any other seasoning mix. Just keep a lid on it and put it in the spice cabinet, it will keep for years. I buy probably one every year.

probally will do it, gotta run it by the boss first though, im not sure she is to impressed with me for buying a banner from the post the other day :roflmaoha0:, cheap until they charge you the shipping LOL, but it looks good and i want it for the deck and cook offs :thumbs up:

californiasmokin
02-10-2009, 10:27 PM
Here is one Trav,

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Slow-Cooked-Squirrel/Detail.aspx

SmokyOkie
02-10-2009, 10:30 PM
Hey Paul, whaddya wanna bet he already ate them all?

I bet he only killed a dozen or two (Hear that Trav?)?

Chargrilled
02-11-2009, 10:01 AM
Thanks for the recipe Paul, saved and printed.

Actually season ended the end of Jan. I ended up with 7 of the dingers, 2 reds and 5 grays. I bagged and froze them seperatally. We are going to slow cook the reds till meat tender, pick em apart use some bacon grease and fry the pieces then make gravy outt the pan. That poured over biscuits.

Coming to a theatre near you!

The grays I may make with the recipe Paul found, it is real similar to one I got from my Aunt.

Gun cleaned and put away till next season.:blushing::tap:

californiasmokin
04-09-2009, 04:42 PM
Don't forget to bring some squirrel for Jake to try at the the lake.

SmokyOkie
04-09-2009, 09:42 PM
You bring it Trav, I'll cook it, and Jake will get none!:roflmaoha0::roflmaoha0::roflmaoha0:

Chargrilled
04-10-2009, 07:45 AM
We can make that happen!!! Still got 2 reds in the freezer!!!:msn-wink:

californiasmokin
04-11-2009, 07:11 PM
We can make that happen!!! Still got 2 reds in the freezer!!!:msn-wink:

I would like to try some !

BA_LoKo
04-11-2009, 07:55 PM
I would like to try some !

I've had squirrel one time. That squirrel must have been a senior citizen! He was tough! I'd try it again, too, if I had the chance.

SmokyOkie
04-11-2009, 08:38 PM
It just didn't simmer long enough.

It's kinda like brisket. If you cook them long enough, they will all get tender.

jerry516planes
04-12-2009, 02:27 PM
We fix ours by first soaking over night in salt water. Then pat dry and roll in flour, eggwash and roll in flour a second time. Pan fry in cast iron. Brown up real nice. Then all back in the pan with a little water and broast till tender. Add a little can of evaporated milk to the drippings for gravy. Make some baking powder biscuits and you have some great eating.

If you want to get really fancy add a can of condenced onion soup.

Tough old yard birds are good this way as well. Tough old yard birds respond verry well to a couple table spoons of baking soda with the salt water pre-soak as well.

Happy eating!!

Jake
04-12-2009, 06:58 PM
I would like to try some !

:smack:your a sick sick man :roflmaoha0::roflmaoha0:
dont know if i would try it, maybe though :ack2:

SmokyOkie
04-12-2009, 09:55 PM
You wouldn't like it Jake, no sense even thinking about trying it.

Just let the rest of us take care of it for you.

Chargrilled
04-13-2009, 09:07 AM
THanks for the info Jerry, had not heard of trying it that way cept for the gravy and biscuits, may have to give that a try too!!!


We fix ours by first soaking over night in salt water. Then pat dry and roll in flour, eggwash and roll in flour a second time. Pan fry in cast iron. Brown up real nice. Then all back in the pan with a little water and broast till tender. Add a little can of evaporated milk to the drippings for gravy. Make some baking powder biscuits and you have some great eating.

If you want to get really fancy add a can of condenced onion soup.

Tough old yard birds are good this way as well. Tough old yard birds respond verry well to a couple table spoons of baking soda with the salt water pre-soak as well.

Happy eating!!