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Smokin Bill
11-25-2008, 09:57 PM
OK this year I'm breaking the walls of my turkey box down and doing a brine; mostly because I'm not stuffing it and want to add the moisture to make up for no stuffing.

My question is; can I brine overnight (like 14 hours-ish) with no undesirable results? My recipe for the brine is as follows; though I added sugar equal to the salt; water, no vegie broth; left out savory (it tastes good):

Turkey Brine





Submitted by: SHERI GAILEY
Rated: 5 out of 5 by 248 members
Prep Time: 5 Minutes
Cook Time: 15 Minutes
Ready In: 8 Hours 20 Minutes
Yields: 15 servings

"This is a tasty brine for any poultry. It will make your bird very juicy, and gravy to die for!!"
INGREDIENTS:
1 gallon vegetable broth
1 cup sea salt
1 tablespoon crushed dried
rosemary
1 tablespoon dried sage
1 tablespoon dried thyme
1 tablespoon dried savory
1 gallon ice water

DIRECTIONS:
1.
In a large stock pot, combine the vegetable broth, sea salt, rosemary, sage, thyme, and savory. Bring to a boil, stirring frequently to be sure salt is dissolved. Remove from heat, and let cool to room temperature.
2.
When the broth mixture is cool, pour it into a clean 5 gallon bucket. Stir in the ice water.
3.
Wash and dry your turkey. Make sure you have removed the innards. Place the turkey, breast down, into the brine. Make sure that the cavity gets filled. Place the bucket in the refrigerator overnight.
4.
Remove the turkey carefully draining off the excess brine and pat dry. Discard excess brine.
5.
Cook the turkey as desired reserving the drippings for gravy. Keep in mind that brined turkeys cook 20 to 30 minutes faster so watch the temperature gauge.

Chargrilled
11-25-2008, 10:10 PM
I am thinking through osmosis that when the equilibrium is reached it really doesn't matter.

You should be good, just keep er in the safe zone:msn-wink:

Smokin Bill
11-25-2008, 10:15 PM
You should be good, just keep er in the safe zone:msn-wink:
Don't worry, the dogs will be watchin them and I carry a .45.:roflmaoha0:

Thanks, I kinda thought so.

chef schwantz
11-25-2008, 11:12 PM
I would think you'll be Ok, just make sure you add the 2 gallons of liquid, and don't let it go more than 10-12 hours. You might wind up "curing" it and it could get a bit chewey. Good luck and let us know.

Smokin Bill
11-25-2008, 11:44 PM
That's a thought. Well I'll have to stay up late to start it then.

chef schwantz
11-25-2008, 11:50 PM
Yeah, I would worry about it, especially with the sugar and salt added, perhaps halve the amounts to attain the same amount total called for in the recipe.

glued2it
11-26-2008, 07:17 AM
When brining turkeys with solution added, You will only want to use 1/2 a cup of salt per gallon. Be sure to check your turkey packaging.
I recommend Kosher salt as opposed to sea salt personally.

Excessive brining may result in a hammy flavor. To which you may "over brine" and end up with more of a turkey pastrami.

:twocents:

fredrogers
11-26-2008, 10:02 AM
I know I would not sweat it.

I have seen turkey brine that call for as long as 16 hours (http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/deep-fried-turkey-recipe/index.html).

-=fred=-

Smokin Bill
11-26-2008, 10:22 AM
Well after much contemplation, here's how I look at it. If turkey being exposed to salt solution made it taste like ham then they all would right out of the store since they are all injected with massive amounts of salt water that they sell for .99/#; so I agree, there is no big sweat.

I'll throw it in the brine tonight and put it in the smoker in the morning and see what happens. It sure is a good tasting brine; I look forward to the results.

PigCicles
11-26-2008, 10:28 AM
The big issue I see is the saltiness of the meat. The brine will help pull moisture in, but will pull the salt and whatever else you have in there too.

Personally I would cut back the salt just for that issue and let it go over nite.

Smokin Bill
11-26-2008, 10:38 AM
The big issue I see is the saltiness of the meat. The brine will help pull moisture in, but will pull the salt and whatever else you have in there too.

Personally I would cut back the salt just for that issue and let it go over nite.

Well being that 3 gallons of the brine is sitting outside in a 20 Qt. stock pot getting and keeping cool, cutting back on the salt is not an option. Whoever let me comfort you by reminding you how good the brine tastes with the sugar and spices added to it. Over salting the bird is my last concern. This is just the first time I've brined and wanted some input.

PigCicles
11-26-2008, 10:41 AM
The I guess it's all good and you can adjust from here anything you think needs changed. Good luck with the brined bird and let us know what you think the outcome is / was.

Smokin Bill
11-26-2008, 11:06 AM
Yea I think I will mind the time a bit. Most of the brine recipes I found are a cup of salt per gallon (then the gallon of ice water) so I dont think that's overdone, in fact since I didn't start out with vegetable broth, which is salty itself, my salt content is under the recipes. Salt and sugar is a very good enhancement combination so I'm not concerned with that combination (change from the recipe). Sea salt v. Kosher salt isn't a very distinguishable difference; sea or Kosher v. iodized salt is a big difference. It tastes wonderful... so I guess the brainstorming is complete and I probably should mind time more than I intended to. I'll put it in the brine about 8 to 12 hours before cooking as most recipes say. There seems to be less risk that way and that was the primary question. If I was cooking for just myself, I might take more chances but I do a community cook and am risking many meals.

Thank you all for your input, it was indeed helpful.

Hey and on another note: did anybody watch the Good Eats episode on turkey where Alton demonstrated thawing methods?

He took ice shaped like little turkeys (about soft ball sized) and (if I can remember it all) put one in the refrigerator, one on the counter, one in a pot of boiling water (then taken off the fire) one in running cold water, and one in a 200 degree oven. Which do you think melted first?

It was the one under running cold water, not the one in the oven or boiling water. I was amazed!!!! The thermal dynamic is that RUNNING water takes more heat away than any standing heat source (convection). That principal is consistent with my assertion that opening a smoker changes how the meat is cooked (wind chill) and the surface of the skin of a human body has a R .1 insulating factor till wind is introduced then it's wind chill factor.

SmokyOkie
11-26-2008, 04:06 PM
I wouldn't brine it. How's that for a suggestion?:oops:

I have cooked dozens of turkeys both unstuffed and stuffed, and the only ones that have turned out dry were the ones that I inadvertently overcooked. If you want a juicy turkey, JUST DON'T OVERCOOK IT!:roflmaoha0:

Cook it until the leg joint moves evenly and check it every 10 minutes during what you anticipate to be the las 30 minutes.

Smokin Bill
11-26-2008, 04:47 PM
I wouldn't brine it. How's that for a suggestion?:oops:

I have cooked dozens of turkeys both unstuffed and stuffed, and the only ones that have turned out dry were the ones that I inadvertently overcooked. If you want a juicy turkey, JUST DON'T OVERCOOK IT!:roflmaoha0:

Cook it until the leg joint moves evenly and check it every 10 minutes during what you anticipate to be the las 30 minutes.

SmokyOkie I have to say I'm most disappointed with your post; of everybody here, as I know them in the short time I've been here, I expected you of all people to respond with a symphony of ideas and wadda you say; DON'T.:smack:

You're right, I do understand dont overcook and am the most abused poster on many forums for speaking out on the subject. I am treated as a serial killer for posting my pull temps and scientific information on pasteurization time/temps. I smoke unstuffed chickens and they are so moist most people cant believe it's possible to attains such results.

Brine for moisture is perhaps more of an excuse to brine; I've never done it and kinda want to try it. What do you think of the recipe I used and your brine input; do you brine?

SmokyOkie
11-26-2008, 10:37 PM
Never brined, don't plan to. Can't see any reason to. :shrug:

As a matter of fact, most commercial turkeys are already brined. If you're curious, look closely under good light and stretch the skin. You should be able to see the needle holes.

i don't know what to say, except, if you want to brine, brine. Personally, I have so much to do in conjunction with the holiday excersise in " dinner Impossible"that I'm not going to take time to do anything that doesn't demonstrate a verifiable benefit.

Smokin Bill
11-26-2008, 11:13 PM
Alright I'll forgive you this time.

I've never brined before either, I'm breaking out of the box this year.

Chargrilled
11-27-2008, 12:25 AM
Never brined, don't plan to. Can't see any reason to. :shrug:

As a matter of fact, most commercial turkeys are already brined. If you're curious, look closely under good light and stretch the skin. You should be able to see the needle holes.

i don't know what to say, except, if you want to brine, brine. Personally, I have so much to do in conjunction with the holiday excersise in " dinner Impossible"that I'm not going to take time to do anything that doesn't demonstrate a verifiable benefit.

Holy Molly. Just Buy Fresh and be done with it.:roflmaoha0::roflmaoha0::roflmaoha0::roflmaoha0 :

Smokin Bill
11-27-2008, 12:41 AM
It's outside in a cooler sittin in the brine guys; I'll let you know how it was.

Smokin Bill
11-27-2008, 05:58 PM
Well I'm cured of brining turkeys (no pun intended); where the flavor was evident, it was good but I thought it was a bomb. I'm going back to what I've done with awesome results from the beginning. At least I tried and now I know.

Sorry no pictures but I do this alone and cook Thanksgiving dinner for multipal families. I dont have time to take pictures.

PigCicles
11-27-2008, 07:23 PM
And such is the reason we try new things. Now you know what you're missing :msn-wink:

We'll let the no pics slide since you are doing such a great service. :thumbs up:

Smokin Bill
11-27-2008, 07:58 PM
We'll let the no pics slide since you are doing such a great service. :thumbs up:
It is a busy day; not everybody can afford Thanksgiving dinner. I live in the City. I'm beat, I'm going to lie down and maybe not get up till tomorrow.

cabinetmaker
11-28-2008, 05:30 PM
I'm with the Okie on the brine thing. I tried it after reading about it at a place I used to visit (:roflmaoha0:). Total waste of time. It was no more moist, or flavorful. My two food grade buckets I bought just for the brining now keep the dog food nice and fresh!:msn-wink:

Smokin Bill
11-28-2008, 05:39 PM
I'm with the Okie on the brine thing. I tried it after reading about it at a place I used to visit (:roflmaoha0:). Total waste of time. It was no more moist, or flavorful. My two food grade buckets I bought just for the brining now keep the dog food nice and fresh!:msn-wink:

Needles to say I'm now with Okie too now; that was my first and last brine. At least I tried. I think brining makes more sense if you buy a fresh turkey.

Okie I just might owe you an apology, you did give good information. LOL

Butt Lover's
11-28-2008, 09:46 PM
I'm late to this conversation - so I hope I am not rehashing what someone else has said. But my thoughts are this = if you buy a turkey or whatever, that is packed in salt water and all that other junk they put in it, it is already at equilibrium and is not going to take in anymore salt. If it is not taking in salt - it's not going to take in any flavor.

I have had great success brining whole, natural chickens that come packed "dry" - but other than that, waste of time if you ask me.

Smokin Bill
11-28-2008, 09:54 PM
I'm late to this conversation - so I hope I am not rehashing what someone else has said. But my thoughts are this = if you buy a turkey or whatever, that is packed in salt water and all that other junk they put in it, it is already at equilibrium and is not going to take in anymore salt. If it is not taking in salt - it's not going to take in any flavor.

I have had great success brining whole, natural chickens that come packed "dry" - but other than that, waste of time if you ask me.

You're absolutely right though I had a few bites that absorbed a little flavor and I might actually use the brine for a fresh chicken someday but I'm done brining turkeys.

SmokinOkie
11-30-2008, 09:58 AM
Never brined, don't plan to. Can't see any reason to. :shrug:



Let me get this straight, you've never done it, so you recommend don't do it?

Now that doesn't make any sense. I'm trying to think of analogies, but I usually try something first before I recommend don't do it. I think it better to let people who've done something comment on it. Just for reference, brining isn't new. I learned about it in the 80's from a chef and MANY a chef uses the technique in the kitchen, long before it became a fad on the internet.

Obviously I'm in the opposite camp since I wrote Brining 101 and I say try it first, experiment. I've helped 100's of peopel with brining and it's NOT overcooking that helped them, brining adds flavor and moisture.

But to each their own. Brining is a tool. Works for some, not for others. Experiment with it and see. But form your own opinion from testing. You might be surprised.

Last year in a class I taught, I brined chicken for each student. I gave them a piece of unbrined chicken and brined chicken. I cook all check to the same temp. Asked them to vote. Guess what won? Uh, no it wasn't the unbrined one.

The only objection I have about brining, is paying other companies for salt water. I'll brine my own.

Smokin'

SmokyOkie
11-30-2008, 01:50 PM
Let me get this straight, you've never done it, so you recommend don't do it?



Good to see ya Russ! How's the "Other Okie" been?

No, I'm not saying I don't recommend it.'m just saying I've never seen the need, especially because most all commercially available turkeys are already brined.

I've eaten brined birds, I've even roasted birds that others have brined. O just don't see the need, particulalry with pre brined birds.

Smokin Bill
11-30-2008, 02:18 PM
This thread was about my first experience with brining a turkey and I've got to agree with Tim; it was a waste of time and good sugar and salt. I only wish the wonderful taste of the brine had entered the bird but an already brined turkey wont accept much more flavor at all.

My next question would be, when you buy a chicken at the grocery store, it it brined? If not I would like to try the brine I tried here on an unbrined chicken. The brine was delicious.

You guys have way too similar names.

SmokyOkie
11-30-2008, 04:51 PM
This thread was about my first experience with brining a turkey and I've got to agree with Tim; it was a waste of time and good sugar and salt. I only wish the wonderful taste of the brine had entered the bird but an already brined turkey wont accept much more flavor at all.

My next question would be, when you buy a chicken at the grocery store, it it brined? If not I would like to try the brine I tried here on an unbrined chicken. The brine was delicious.

You guys have way too similar names.

What? Russ and Tim?:roflmaoha0:

Actually strictly coincidental. We met at a BBQ comp in Stillwater OK and ended up cooking 1 space apart. Small world.

Whether or not a chicken is brined would depend on the supplier. It will say something like water added or something similar on the package. We buy the Smart chicken brand which is air chilled and not brined.

Smart Chicken (http://www.smartchicken.com/)

Short One
11-30-2008, 05:59 PM
Tim, some Smart Chickens are raised in my area. There are 5 barns within two miles of my house, and each hold something like 45,000 birds. One of the guys that has two barns also works at the chicken plant. Have gotten some product from him and they are good eats.

SmokyOkie
11-30-2008, 06:09 PM
We think they're worth the extra bucks!

PigCicles
11-30-2008, 06:47 PM
Smart Chicken huh? If they're so stinkin smart, why can't they escape?

Kind of like a lucky rabbits foot maybe??? :roflmaoha0:

Smokin Bill
11-30-2008, 08:40 PM
Whether or not a chicken is brined would depend on the supplier. It will say something like water added or something similar on the package. We buy the Smart chicken brand which is air chilled and not brined.

Smart Chicken (http://www.smartchicken.com/)

Thanks I guess I could have figured that out. I would like to find one that could be successfully brined since that solution was so good and was a 5 star recipe.

Smart Chicken, what a concept.

Jake
12-01-2008, 03:06 PM
Smart Chicken huh? If they're so stinkin smart, why can't they escape?

Kind of like a lucky rabbits foot maybe??? :roflmaoha0:

:roflmaoha0::roflmaoha0::roflmaoha0:

thanks for the read folks:thumbs up: